Nanny State Undermines the Golden Rule; Obama Progressivism Is Alien to American Religious Tradition

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 18, 2011 | Go to article overview

Nanny State Undermines the Golden Rule; Obama Progressivism Is Alien to American Religious Tradition


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Faith is innate. That's the simple conclusion of a poll conducted by England's Oxford University to discover the dimensions of the human tendency to seek God. The results affirm what most of us already know: Human beings are born to believe. Too bad that here in America, the so-called progressive ideology that powers President Obama's Washington actively impedes the flourishing of faith.

The Cognition, Religion and Theology Project was conducted at a cost of $4 million with more than 40 studies taking place in 20 countries around the world over a three-year period. "We tend to see purpose in the world. We see agency. We think that something is there even if you can't see it. .. All this tends

to build up to a religious way of thinking," project co-director and Oxford University professor Roger Trigg told CNN on Thursday following the study's release

A fundamental notion of a religious person is the belief that he's living under the watchful eye of God. For those of the Judeo-Christian tradition, the tenet is encapsulated in Matthew 7:12 of the New Testament in which Jesus says, Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. This concept of a Golden Rule in which each individual is responsible for making choices that ensure fair treatment for others is as universal as values get. …

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Nanny State Undermines the Golden Rule; Obama Progressivism Is Alien to American Religious Tradition
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