2010 Awards and Honors

NBER Reporter, Spring 2011 | Go to article overview

2010 Awards and Honors


A number of NBER researchers received honors, awards, and other forms of professional recognition during 2010 and early 2011. A list of these honors, excluding those that were bestowed by the researcher's home university and listing researchers in alphabetical order, is presented below.

Viral Acharya received the Goldman Sachs International Award at the European Finance Association Meetings for best conference paper in 2010, for "The Seeds of a Crisis: A Theory of Bank Liquidity and Risk Taking over the Business Cycle," joint with Hassan Naqvi.

James D. Adams was appointed ASA/ NSF/BEA Senior Research Fellow at the Bureau of Economic Analysis during academic year 2010-11. He also won an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation Fellowship to conduct research on "Technological Determinants of the Quality and Price of Innovative Industrial Products," at the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) in Washington, DC for 2010-11.

Heitor Almeida received an award from the Review of Financial Studies for "Referee of the Year" in 2010.

Douglas Almond won a five-year NSF CAREER Award for "Health Determinants and Research Design." The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is an NSF-wide activity that supports the early career-development activities of those teacher-scholars who most effectively integrate research and education within the context of the mission of their organization.

Joseph Altonji was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Andrew Ang won a three-year grant from Netspar on optimal portfolio strategies.

Orley Ashenfelter became a Fellow of the Labor and Employment Relations Association. He is also president-elect of the American Economic Association.

Jeremy Atack is President-Elect of the Economic History Association (he assumes the Presidency in September 2011).

Katherine Baickerwas appointe d to the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission and named a member of the Congressional Budget Office's Panel of Health Advisers and a Fellow of TIAA-CREF Institute. She also became Vice Chair of the AcademyHealth Board of Directors. Her paper (with David Cutler and Zirui Song) received a prize for "outstanding journal article" by the Continuing Care Alliance.

Spencer Banzhaf won the History of Economic Society's 2010 award for "best paper in the history of economics" for "Objectiveor Multi-Objective: Two Historically Competing Visions for Benefit-Cost Analysis," published in Land Economics in 2009.

Lucien Bebchuk was vice-president of the Western Economic Association International for 2010-11.

Francine D. Blau is the 2010 winner of the IZA (Institute for the Study of Labor) Prize in Labor Economics.

Alan S. Blinder received the Doctor of Humane Letters (honoris causa) from Bard College in 2010. He also delivered the Homer Jones Memorial Lecture at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in April 2010.

Nick Bloom won an Alfred Sloan Fellowship, an NSF Career Grant, and the Frisch Medal from the Econometric Society.

Michael Brandt, Ralph Koijen, and Jules van Binsbergen, won the 2010 Swiss Finance Institute Award for the best paper of the year for "On the Timing and Pricing of Dividends."

Jeffrey R. Brown was appointed to the Board of Trustees of TIAA (the insurance company side of TIAA-CREF) and was elected to the Board of Directors of the American Risk and Insurance Association.

Markus K. Brunnermeier received a Guggenheim Fellowship for studying "Financial Frictions and the Macroeconomy." He also received the 2010 T.W. Schultz Prize from the University of Chicago and became a Fellow of the Econometric Society.

Richard V. Burkhauser was the 2010 President of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. His coauthored paper "Minimum Wages and Poverty: Will a $9.50 Federal Minimum Wage Really Help the Working Poor? …

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