Teaching Role-Playing Instruction in Second Life: An Exploratory Study

By Vasileiou, Vasilis N.; Paraskeva, Fotini | Journal of Information, Information Technology, and Organizations, Annual 2010 | Go to article overview

Teaching Role-Playing Instruction in Second Life: An Exploratory Study


Vasileiou, Vasilis N., Paraskeva, Fotini, Journal of Information, Information Technology, and Organizations


Introduction

School organizations need to provide teachers with ample opportunities for skill development and individual training, knowledge, and practice sharing through collaborative work, team planning, critical thinking, and reflection. Teachers should improve their instructional competencies and feel confident that they can effectively achieve specific learning goals and make the right decisions in any given learning environment (Darling-Hammond & McLaughlin, 1995). Therefore, there should be access to experimentation with new instructional models and to appropriately executed feedback systems, which enable users to make mistakes, learn from the consequences and try again.

Tremendous progress in information and communication technology (ICT) in the last decade has a great effect on teaching and learning practices. Work of the 21st century teachers is becoming highly challenging and complex: they should be capable of creating digital learning resources and designing online activities in cooperation with other educators (Retalis, Papasalouros, Avgeriou, & Siassiakos, 2004). Teachers should also reflect on experimentations and innovations as "reflective practitioners", i.e., gain knowledge and skills to a greater extent than do theorists and researchers of the same domain (Russell, 2005; Schon, 1983). According to the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (International Society for Technology in Education [ISTE], 2008), educators need to enrich their instructional methodology, to foster student creativity and design and assess authentic and contextualized learning in face-to-face or virtual environments. And the most effective way of meeting successfully the increasing technology and learning needs is by providing a high quality teacher professional development.

In the wake of the above mentioned developments innovative forms of organizations with new structures, culture, and design attributes come into existence, such as the virtual organization (VO). According to Travica (1997), the virtual organizational form is "characterized by a temporary or permanent collection of geographically dispersed individuals, groups or organization departments not belonging to the same organization--or entire organizations, that are dependent on electronic communication for carrying out their production process". VOs are network-based organizations, which facilitate the collaboration of geographically dispersed multiple specialists on specific objectives, the combination of different methods across boundaries, and the sharing of resources and skills. There are different kinds of VOs. One that is important for this study is the virtual classroom (Hiltz, 1994). VOs can have team aspects. A strong feeling of mutual dependency between partners in the virtual teams, due to the heterogeneity and the different level of specialism, and the temporary nature are considered to be among the VO's characteristics (Jagers, Jansen, & Steenbakkers, 1998).

Virtual worlds may enhance learner engagement by providing opportunities for content creation, decision making, problem solving, and reflection (Dickey, 2005). Multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) enable the contextualization of learning in authentic conditions and they can engage the users in activities that take place in communities of practice. Thus, Situated Cognition is perceived as the most suitable learning theory for designing and implementing learning activities in these environments (Halverson, Shaffer, Squire, & Steinkuehler, 2006). Among the instructional techniques which are ideal for understanding and practicing in virtual environments is role playing.

Based on situated learning theory and, specifically, on the model of Cognitive Apprenticeship, we have developed in the virtual world of Second Life a proper learning environment for teacher educators to teach their colleagues the role-playing instruction. As a case scenario we used three scenes of rhapsody e (book 5) of Homer's Odyssey (Calypso's island). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Teaching Role-Playing Instruction in Second Life: An Exploratory Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.