Coming Soon: Military Child Education Coalition 2011 Conference

The Exceptional Parent, April 2011 | Go to article overview

Coming Soon: Military Child Education Coalition 2011 Conference


There are almost two million U.S. military-connected children all around the world, moving on average six to nine times during their educational careers. This outstanding group of kids faces many unique challenges as their parents serve in the U.S. Military.

The Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC), a nonprofit 501 (c)(3) organization, has worked hard for more than a decade to create programs, provide training, publish materials, and conduct research all with these students in mind. The MCEC initiatives and resources are created for many audiences, including families, education professionals, students, military members, communities, and parents caring for their loved ones with special needs.

The MCEC Annual Conference is a time when these groups come together to learn, share, network, and have a great time while also celebrating America's children. The 13th Annual Conference will be held at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel in Nashville, Tennessee, on June 21-23, 2011, with the theme Military Children: A Nation's Inspiration.

Each year the MCEC Annual Conference strives to inform and inspire attendees, providing the direction and the tools to continue serving all military-connected children. The value of the conference is reflected in the words of one educator: "This conference reminds me that I am serving my country when I am serving the military child."

Some highlights for this year's conference include:

* General Norton A. Schwartz is Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C. Prior to assuming his current position, General Schwartz was Commander, U.S. Transportation Command and is a command pilot with more than 4,400 flying hours in a variety of aircraft.

* Barry Schwartz is a Dorwin Cartwright Professor of Social Theory and Social Action at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania. He is also the author of several books, including Paradox of Choice.

* Doris Kearns Goodwin won the Pulitzer Prize in history for No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II, which was a bestseller in hardcover and trade paper. …

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