AAHD's Health Promotion and Wellness: Part 1: Obesity and Disability

The Exceptional Parent, May 2011 | Go to article overview

AAHD's Health Promotion and Wellness: Part 1: Obesity and Disability


Welcome to a new series from the American Association on Health and Disability (AAHD). The mission of AAHD is to advance health promotion and wellness interventions for children and adults with disabilities. AAHD accomplishes its mission through advocacy, education, public awareness and research efforts at the federal, state and community levels. AAHD staff will be writing a series of articles on "Health Promotion and Wellness" for the next 3 issues of Exceptional Parent. We hope you enjoy these articles and consider joining AAHD to receive the Disability and Health Journal and have access to current research, policy and programmatic information on disability and health via AAHD updates. Visit www.aahd.us to learn more about AAHD and membership.

Obesity increases the risk of many health conditions, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes, cancers, high blood pressure, lipid disorders, stroke and more. While obesity affects more than one third of all adult Americans, people with disabilities are more likely to be overweight or obese and often have fewer tools for controlling weight at their disposal.

* 20% of children age 10 through 17 with special health care needs are obese versus 15% of children without special health care needs. (1)

* Children and adults with mobility limitations and intellectual or learning disabilities are at greatest risk for obesity. (2)

* Obesity rates for adults with disabilities are 58% higher than for adults without disabilities (3)

LINK BETWEEN DISABILITY AND OBESITY

Looking at the link from different directions, almost 20% of overweight adults and roughly 30% of obese adults also have a disability, while roughly 36% of people with disabilities are also obese. (3) Of adolescents with special health care needs, more than 35% were either overweight or obese. (4) The same report found that adolescents with special health care needs who are also obese were more likely not to participate in sports or do daily physical activities, watch two or more hours of TV per day, have a TV in their bedrooms, live in unsafe neighborhoods, and experience limitations in attending school, making friends and participating in activities.

To determine obesity in adults, weight and height are used to calculate body mass index (BMI). Adults whose BMI is between 25 and 29.9 are considered overweight, and those whose BMI is 30 or higher are considered obese. For children of the same age and sex, the CDC defines overweight as a BMI at or above the 85th percentile and obesity as a BMI at or above the 95th percentile. However, many researchers believe that for people with disabilities, BMI is not always the best way to measure overweight and obesity because it can underestimate fat in people with less lean muscle mass (http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/disabilityandhealth/obesity.html). Some researchers prefer to use waist measurement to determine whether people with disabilities are overweight or obese.

WHY ARE PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES MORE LIKELY TO BE OVERWEIGHT OR OBESE?

There are many reasons why people with disabilities may have a higher incidence of overweight and obesity, including the following:

* They might have fewer healthy food choices.

* Some medications affect appetite and contribute to weight gain.

* Physical limitations, pain or lack of energy can exercise more difficult. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

AAHD's Health Promotion and Wellness: Part 1: Obesity and Disability
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    New feature

    It is estimated that 1 in 10 people have dyslexia, and in an effort to make Questia easier to use for those people, we have added a new choice of font to the Reader. That font is called OpenDyslexic, and has been designed to help with some of the symptoms of dyslexia. For more information on this font, please visit OpenDyslexic.org.

    To use OpenDyslexic, choose it from the Typeface list in Font settings.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.