U.S. Whites Who Feel They Suffer Worse Racism Than Blacks

Daily Mail (London), May 25, 2011 | Go to article overview

U.S. Whites Who Feel They Suffer Worse Racism Than Blacks


Byline: From Daniel Bates in New York

WHITE people in America now believe they suffer more racism than blacks, a groundbreaking study has found.

After decades of multiculturalism, they feel that improvements in equality for ethnic minorities has come at their own expense.

Whites now think they face more discrimination than black people throughout their lives. The U.S. study is one of the first to show the effect of 'reverse racism' towards white people which has sprung out of fear of offending non-whites.

Its authors say it could have 'clear implications' for future research - but also for politicians responsible for allowing the problem to develop.

The research found that both whites and blacks agree anti-black racism has decreased over the last 60 years.

However, whites are convinced anti-white racism has increased and is now a bigger problem than anti-black racism.

The team from Harvard Business School and Tufts University in Massachusetts came to their conclusion after contacting a random sample of 208 black people and 209 whites. They asked them to rate on a scale of one to ten how much discrimination each group had faced since the 1950s. Blacks saw bias against them decline steadily, from an average rating of 9.7 in the 1950s to 6.1 in the 2000s. Over the same period, there was a small increase in antiwhite bias, from 1.4 to 1.8. Whites saw an even steeper decline in anti-black bias: from 9.1, in the 1950s, to 3.6, in the 2000s.

But in a striking twist, among whites there was a dramatic increase in perceived anti-white bias over the same period, which went up from 1.8 to 4.7. The researchers concluded that whites thought that antiwhite discrimination was a greater social problem than bias against blacks.

'The data is the first to demonstrate that not only do whites think more progress has been made toward equality than do blacks, but whites also now believe that this progress is linked to a new inequality - at their expense,' the authors wrote. …

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