Mentoring Doctoral Students in a Developing Society

By Mohan, V. Vishwa | Issues in Informing Science & Information Technology, Annual 2010 | Go to article overview

Mentoring Doctoral Students in a Developing Society


Mohan, V. Vishwa, Issues in Informing Science & Information Technology


Introduction

When the topic of mentoring Doctoral Students arises, immediately, the question, "Is there any need for mentoring Doctoral Students?" would arise. Especially, when right from the Under Graduate level, the present day students are required to work on assignments, projects, dissertations, seminar presentations, etc. They have been guided through out. When it comes to Doctoral research work, the Doctoral Students are supposed to have research aptitude and the research guide or supervisor is expected to guide the student right from the identification of the research problem till the completion of the research report. Guiding and rectifying the mistakes in the research work and also the research report are part of the duty of the research supervisor. Mere guiding and putting the Doctoral Students on the right track, is called mentoring? It is the basic function of the research supervisor. Then what is mentoring? Mentoring is something beyond this basic function of the research supervisor. In fact, this is more important than mere guiding. I would say, "Mentoring is more important, without which, the quality of research work will be affected, the research aptitude of the students would not improve, and there will be the instances of dropouts even at the level of Doctoral Research." Research has demonstrated that good mentoring is a key variable for determining success in a doctoral program (Adams & Conley, 1986). Especially in the developing societies, the background and characteristics of the students are different from the students in developed societies. These students are characterized by rural background, regional media, economic backwardness, etc. The students in Indian universities come from different backgrounds, hence, mentoring proves to be imperative in Indian universities.

Further, Doctoral research work is an important academic activity due to which new knowledge would be contributed by the academic institutions, it promotes collaborative research, an understanding and continued relation between the teacher/supervisor and the taught. Thus it builds the academic and research communities. Therefore, mentoring is as important as guiding and correcting the research work. Summers-Ewing (1994) concludes that "people with mentors become quickly socialized to an organization or profession, obtain high-visibility assignments, stay well-informed of future opportunities and are coached to success." Quoting Jacobi (1991), Dickinson and Johnson (2000) present the characteristic merits of mentoring noted general agreement that: (a) mentor relationships are helping and supportive relationships which help the protege succeed in school, work or in reaching long range goals, (b) mentoring includes component areas of psychosocial support, direct assistance and role modeling, (c) mentoring relationships are reciprocal in that the mentor has been found to also benefit from the relationship, (d) mentor relationships are personal, and (e) within the mentor relationship, the mentor shows greater professional experience, influence and achievement. Dickinson and Johnson (2000) further state, the psychosocial functions include role modeling, provision of acceptance and support, counseling and friendship.

The mentor/mentee relationship becomes more vital depending on the psychological, social and cultural background of the mentee. Ku, Lahman, Yeh, & Cheng, (2008) state that, "The mentor/mentee relationship may be even more vital for international graduate students because they are dealing with a high level of cultural adjustment and language barriers, along with attempting to understand the culture of academia." This is quite true, every student has his/her own typical psychological, social, economic, and cultural background that influence his/her behavior.

The observations of Collinson and Hockey (1997) as quoted by Deem and Brehony (2002) are almost the same with the present conditions of Doctoral Research in non-science fields in our university. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Mentoring Doctoral Students in a Developing Society
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.