Obama's Illusory Foreign Policy; President's Formula for Peace Would Lead to War

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 26, 2011 | Go to article overview

Obama's Illusory Foreign Policy; President's Formula for Peace Would Lead to War


Byline: Janice Shaw Crouse, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

President Obama claims and the mainstream media dutifully report that his stance on Israel is just like that of previous presidents and he cannot understand all the fuss following his remarks at the annual assembly of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC). Over the weekend, he tried to repair the damage and set the record straight by explaining what I actually said instead of what he was reported to have said.

The problem is that he actually said exactly what he was reported to have said, and he said it in a rather defensive and angry tone of voice. Apparently, the president finds it very frustrating when people see through his attempts to obfuscate, and he comes back with further obfuscation in continuing attempts to appear to be saying something different from what he actually said. But his message was clear: (1) He wants Israel to negotiate with Hamas, which has openly stated its goal of destroying Israel; (2) he wants a contiguous Palestinian state, which is a geographical impossibility for Israel; and (3) he supports a peace treaty based on the 1967 lines with mutually agreed swaps - a position that Israel has long stated is indefensible. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu declared that the pre-1967 borders were not the boundaries of peace; they were the boundaries of repeated wars.

Even those of us who are not experts on foreign policy see the implausibility of those demands. The president talked about new demographic realities on the ground, but Mr. Netanyahu stated that the president's stance was based on illusions. Mr. Netanyahu stated bluntly that Israel will never go back to the old borders - such a move would be, as previously stated, indefensible. Those 1967 lines are the ones that were in place before the Six Day War - clearly a defensive effort to protect Israel against aggressors. How can the president not understand that he has thrown Israel under the bus? How does he not see that his Middle East statements are alienating Jewish and pro-Israel Americans? Even as he tried to smooth over the firestorm of opposition, he continued to stoke Israel's fury by repeating his recommendation that any peace talks begin by accepting the 1967 borders - an assertion that shows his illusions and naivete.

The incompetence in the White House is getting more and more serious, not just endangering our relationships with our staunchest allies but threatening the stability of our own nation as well. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Obama's Illusory Foreign Policy; President's Formula for Peace Would Lead to War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.