Patent Reform Proposals Threaten American Prosperity; Importing Foreign Patent Law Will Undermine American Inventors

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 27, 2011 | Go to article overview

Patent Reform Proposals Threaten American Prosperity; Importing Foreign Patent Law Will Undermine American Inventors


Byline: Rep. Donald A. Manzullo, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Our nation's greatness can be tracked to our early days of innovation and entrepreneurship. The United States of America was the place where life-altering inventions were born and marketed to the masses to change the course of history. The great American inventors, including Samuel Morse, Thomas Edison, Alexander Graham Bell and the Wright brothers, set our nation on the path to prosperity.

Despite this impressive track record, which has been the envy of the world, some in Congress want to change our successful patent system, which has guided American innovation for generations. Legislation has been introduced again in Congress this year to dramatically alter our patent system and harmonize it with those in Asia and Europe, regions that do not produce anywhere near the scope of innovation as America. Could it be that our current patent system is better at protecting inventions?

I have had serious concerns with previous patent-reform efforts that have threatened the inventions of American entrepreneurs. I have successfully worked with the House Judiciary Committee to develop lower fees for small inventors and protect them from the premature release of their patents. Unfortunately, contentious issues in patent reform keep re-emerging.

I am deeply concerned that the America Invents Act (H.R. 1249), which was introduced earlier this year, will stall American innovation and send more of our jobs overseas. This legislation reflects an approach to patent reform that stalled previously, in 2007, in the face of massive opposition from American innovators.

Like its Senate counterpart (S. 23), the House bill includes an unfortunate provision that would shift America's current patent system (in which the first person to conceive of an invention is granted a patent) to a first to file system that would turn our system into a foot race to the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO).

The U.S. has always awarded a patent to the first inventor to come up with an idea, even if somebody else beat him to the PTO. The Constitution, in fact, mandates that inventors have exclusive right to their discoveries. It's one of the main tenets of our nation that have led our citizens to seek the American dream. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Patent Reform Proposals Threaten American Prosperity; Importing Foreign Patent Law Will Undermine American Inventors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.