Everyday Saints


How faith shapes the lives of individual Mormons.

1. Lessons in Salesmanship

David Neeleman

52, founder of JetBlue, New Canaan, Conn.

I learned to be a better CEO on my mission. You're really pushing something that is a little spectacular. It teaches you to be a great salesman; it teaches you to be a great people person.

2. Love and Justice

Vince Arayan Molejon

26, entrepreneur, Davao City, Philippines

The principles of my faith serve as my steering wheel. My faith gives me a feeling that every human being I come in contact with is somehow connected to me, thus helping me treat people with love and justice.

3. Political Diversity

Sen. Mike Lee

40, Alpine, Utah

You can have different Latter-day Saints with different political ideologies. Take Harry Reid on the left and me on the right. We come to different conclusions on the role of the federal government. But he's no less of a Mormon because he comes down on different positions.

4. Enduring Bonds

Whitney Johnson

48, hedge-fund manager, Boston

In Penelope Trunk's words, "Religion is the best preparation for a career," because in both you have to ask yourself, what do I want from my life? And because my relationships with people endure even after I die, I manage them like I would an investment not to be day-traded, but to be bought and held.

5. A Conservative Faith

Sen. Orrin Hatch

77, Salt Lake City

By and large, it's a conservative religion. My faith informs every aspect of my life. It's not a just-on-Sunday religion. It's a commitment, a lifestyle. …

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