Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and Enduring Change

By Lebovitz, Phil S. | Clinical Psychiatry News, May 2011 | Go to article overview

Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and Enduring Change


Lebovitz, Phil S., Clinical Psychiatry News


After working with patients at the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis for many years, I have become more and more convinced that psychodynamic psychotherapy can lead to change that is both effective and lasting. In fact, we've got solid data that back up this contention.

In follow-up studies at the institute, my colleagues and I looked at 40 patients 2 or more years after they had completed psychoanalysis by mutual agreement with the treating psychoanalyst.

We were very careful to use safety and consent procedures aimed at avoiding disruptive effects on the patients. For example, the interviewing analysts reviewed process notes of the original analysts so that they would not inadvertently inquire into traumatic areas. This goal was balanced against the concern about the analyst having too much information about resultant biases.

Our findings should be particularly rewarding to those of us who have dedicated our lives doing this work: The change that our patients experienced proved enduring. Furthermore, we found two key elements that correlated with that enduring change.

The first, which occurred as the treatment reached its concluding phase, is characterized by a capacity to self-analyze and recognize the disruptive patterns that led the patients to treatment and to modify those patterns using the self-analytic capacity.

An essential component of this is a process of cycling between a character style that early in life had been adaptive and later became dysfunctional and the painful tensions of needs that had led to the character style.

The second element involved a period of mourning the loss of the psychoanalysis and the psychoanalyst. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and Enduring Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.