Current Bibliography

By Brooks, Tim | ARSC Journal, Fall 2010 | Go to article overview

Current Bibliography


Brooks, Tim, ARSC Journal


"Current Bibliography" is an annotated index to research on recording history that has appeared recently in specialized journals. To be indexed here an article must be in English, be reasonably substantive, and deal with recording history--as opposed to musicology, sociology, or contemporary subjects such as collecting or record reviews. "W/D" or "discog." means that the article was accompanied by something at least remotely resembling a discography.

Issues covered this time were received between February and August 2010. If you contact one of these publications or authors, please mention ARSC and "Current Bibliography. Corrections or suggested entries may be sent to the compiler at tim@timbrooks.net.

News of Publications

With this issue we add JazzBeat, which has been around since 1989 though obviously not with the visibility of some of the other publications listed here. It is published in New Orleans by George H. Buck's Collector's Record Club, which it. was my pleasure to visit (along with Steve Ramm) when I was in New Orleans making preparations for the 2010 ARSC conference. We didn't get to meet the elderly Mr. Buck, who has dedicated his life to preserving and reissuing classic jazz, but much of the history of that music is reflected in the pages of this occasional magazine.

In news of newsletters, The Starr-Gennett News, published hy the Starr-Gennett Foundation since 2001, switched to online publication effective with the Fall 2009 issue (7:2) and will no longer be included here. It contains occasional short articles on the Gennett Records legacy. Unlike some "online publications" it can be downloaded as a pdf, offering at least some sort of permanence. I've also occasionally cited articles about ethnographic field recording that appeared in Resound, the newsletter of Indiana University's Archives of Traditional Music. This began in 1982 and ceased with the October/December 2007 issue. At least the Archive is still there.

Goldmine shrinks again! In May 2010 the venerable rock magazine went from large newspaper size to 8x10 1/2" magazine size, printed on flimsy newsprint and resembling a supermarket giveaway. Simultaneously it underwent yet another turnover of editors and shifted to short, superficial articles. Coverage of current news virtually disappeared, and occasional articles dealing with historical figures were often an embarrassment ("Gus Cannon May Not Be Famous, But 'Walk Right In' Sure Is"). Subscribers howled, and the publication soon switched to a heavier grade of paper (less likely to be chewed up in the mail) and more substantive articles began to appear. Most valuable are its informative interviews, primarily with artists of the 1960s-1980s.

In the Groove, published by the Michigan Antique Phonograph Society, has switched from monthly to bi-monthly publication and at the same time introduced glossy stock, full color covers and snazzy graphics to accompany its short hut informative articles about machines and other subjects of interest to collectors. The new format was introduced in a 40-page August/September 2010 "special issue."

Quite a few interesting articles crossed my desk during the preparation of this column. Black Music Research Journal has devoted a second entire issue (Spring 2010) to Howard Rye's groundbreaking work on the Southern Syncopated Orchestra, which never recorded as a unit but which spawned many groups and musicians that did, and which had an outsized impact on the development of black jazz in Europe in the 1920s. The IAJRC Journal, which fairly bulges with information on historic jazz, has reprinted "Jazz Magazines Index to 1965," a crude index compiled long ago to artist-related articles appearing in a dozen 1950s-60s jazz magazines, among them Crescendo, Down Beat, Jazz Forum, Melody Maker and Record Changer (September 2010).

Han Enderman continues his detailed evaluation of the Online Discographical Project (www. …

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