The Shocking Truth about Learning

Manila Bulletin, June 11, 2011 | Go to article overview

The Shocking Truth about Learning


MANILA, Philippines - There is a growing educational revolution and education innovators, led by Peter Senge, are seriously rallying behind it.Embarking on an aggressive global campaign to change the mindset of people, and work towards the creation of truly effective schools that learn, American educator Senge revealed some shocking truths in a lecture for Filipino educators.For instance, there is the existence of a "one-size-fits-all" type of education, a product of the industrial revolution in the 19th century."Did you go to a school that had Grades 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6? This was the case because the modern urban school was modeled after the most successful institutional innovation of Europe, the assembly line, which produced an unparalleled number of uniform manufactured objects more rapidly than before, increased labor productivity, training workers doing repetitive tasks," explained Senge, a senior lecturer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sloan School of Business.Assembly line educationSo the kids graduating from sixth grade in the 1800s and 1900s naturally ended up working in factories, he added."The school was not about education. It was about socialization and training kids to work. Children are segregated by age into grades and everyone was supposed to move from stage to stage together. The whole school was designed to run at a uniform speed, complete with bells and rigid daily time schedules. Each teacher knew what had to be covered in order to keep the line moving, even though he or she had little influence on its preset speed, which was determined by school boards and standardized curricula," Senge further described in his new book "Schools that Learn: A Fifth Discipline Fieldbook for Educators, Parents and Everyone who cares about Education." Senge co-authors this book with educators Nelda Cambron-McCabe, Timothy Lucas, Bryan Smith, Janis Dutton and Art Kleiner.Senge said this industrial-age system changed the way education is taught and the way students learn.For one, students learned about the world not to control it but to understand and fit into it.Second, kids were classified into either smart or dumb."Those who did not learn at a speed of the assembly line either fell off or were forced to struggle to keep pace; they were labeled "slow" or "learning disabled." It established uniformity of product and process as norms, thereby naively assuming all children learn in the same way. It made educators into controllers, establishing teacher-centered rather than learner-centered learning. The assembly line model identified students as the product rather than the creators of learning, passive objects being shaped by an educational process beyond their influence," Senge said.According to Senge, the purpose of schools today is still based on that assembly-line model, which is to train people to go into jobs in the various industries so the businesses will thrive and the country will grow.Senge is the chairperson of the Society for Organizational Learning (SoL), a global community of organizations, researchers, and consultants who are building knowledge about fundamental change. In 1997, Senge first came up with a revolutionary book titled ''The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization" which translated the abstract ideas of systems theory into tools for better understanding of economic and organizational change.The apprenticeSenge believes that the learning-from-a-mentor form of education is still among the most ideal methods to help students apply the lessons they learned in school, and be exposed early on to real-life people and processes."Apprenticeship is a traditional form of education. If you want to learn something, go to somebody who knows how to do it and you become an apprentice to that person. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Shocking Truth about Learning
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.