Haunting Pipes Pierced the Air

Daily Mail (London), June 15, 2011 | Go to article overview

Haunting Pipes Pierced the Air


Byline: Ferghal Blaney

AFTER the public funeral service, it was a small group of close friends and family who gathered for an intimate ceremony at a tiny graveyard as Brian Lenihan was finally laid to rest.

Less than ten cars followed the hearse containing Mr Lenihan's body on its final journey down the small winding country road that led to the picturesque burial spot of St David's Church, Kilsallaghan, North Dublin, chosen by Mr Lenihan himself. Few politicians or public figures joined the private burial, with Fianna Fail party leader Micheal Martin among the few observed at the serene and peaceful service.

The silence was punctuated briefly as the cortege arrived at the church, when a small group of about 50 locals showed their appreciation for 'Intimate family gathering' Mr Lenihan by applauding the passing of his coffin.

One of those who lined the roadside outside the graveyard as the tricolour-draped coffin moved past was Kilsallaghan resident and former senator, Joe O'Toole.

The matriarch of the Lenihan political dynasty and Mr Lenihan's aunt, Mary O'Rourke, was touched by the gesture.

She rolled down her window as she passed the ex-senator and said simply: 'Thank you Joe.' The former finance minister chose the tranquil surroundings of Kilsallaghan for his burial some time ago, telling one local who was at the final farewell two months ago that 'he absolutely loved the place'.

Bishop Paul Colton, the Church of Ireland bishop of Cork and former rector at Castleknock, was a friend of Mr Lenihan's and joined Father Eugene Kennedy on the altar at St Mochta's yesterday. Shortly after Mr Lenihan's death on Friday, Bishop Colton tweeted: 'Hugely sad at the death of my friend Brian Lenihan, T.D. When I was Rector of Castleknock he became a sound and wise friend. …

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