Getting It Rite in Hollywood; Following Fassbender and Farrell, Colin O'Donoghue Looks Set to Be the Next Irish Export to Trouble the A-List. but Far from Hell-Raising, He Says He's a Good Catholic Boy Who Still Goes to Mass

Daily Mail (London), June 17, 2011 | Go to article overview

Getting It Rite in Hollywood; Following Fassbender and Farrell, Colin O'Donoghue Looks Set to Be the Next Irish Export to Trouble the A-List. but Far from Hell-Raising, He Says He's a Good Catholic Boy Who Still Goes to Mass


Byline: by Tom Sykes

THE lengths to which actors will go to get into character for a challenging role are the stuff of movie legend. Daniel Day-Lewis famously refused to get out of his wheelchair, insisting on being spoon-fed by bemused members of cast and crew when filming My Left Foot.

Christian Bale starved himself for over four months prior to filming The Machinist, surviving on an apple and a can of tuna each day in a bid to reduce his body weight by 28kg to a paltry 54kg. Dustin Hoffman would take long-distance runs before shooting key scenes of the Seventies' classic Marathon Man.

And when Colin O'Donoghue, a handsome 30-year-old actor from Drogheda, landed a starring role opposite Anthony Hopkins in the exorcism thriller The Rite, he travelled to Rome and attended a number of exorcisms to get into character.

'I spoke to exorcists about their experiences, and I saw five or six exorcisms in Rome. I also read a lot about it -- books on theology, demons and angels. It's a fascinating subject once you begin to get into it. You could keep going forever.'

So what forms did the exorcisms take? Did he ever see anything that compares to the disturbing experience of one subject in the film who, during an exorcism, coughs up a nail?

'No,' he replies. 'I found it to be a bit like a form of therapy, or prayer. The person sits very quietly on a chair, and the priest will put his hand on their head and pray over them quietly.

'I did see some mild physical reactions at some of the exorcisms I attended. Some of the people being exorcised would start yawning or burping compulsively, which, the priests told me, could be the spirits or demons leaving the person's body. But I didn't see anything incredibly extreme.

out 'The most dramatic one I attended I didn't actually get to see -- because the woman who was being exorcised closed the door. She didn't want us to watch, but we were standing outside and we could hear her screaming and crying and thrashing about,' says Colin.

'I talked to Matt Baglio, who actually wrote The Rite book, and he told me that he has witnessed some pretty extreme reactions at exorcisms.

'It was weird, it was definitely freaky. But Marta Gastini, who plays Rosaria, [the character who coughs up nails -- check it out on YouTube if you dare] saw one exorcism where there was a much more extreme reaction. The woman's voice actually changed during it.' include spitting water or a tantrum you enter a church So where did the exorcisms take place? In the main knave of the church? Or even on the alter? 'No, we all went to a church in Rome and they took place in a special room off to the side of the alter. They have rooms set aside for this purpose in a number of churches in Italy. Exorcism takes place over there far more often than I would have ever thought.'

The Rite is loosely based on the fascinating true-life story of Father Gary Thomas, who ended up acting as a consultant on the film. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Getting It Rite in Hollywood; Following Fassbender and Farrell, Colin O'Donoghue Looks Set to Be the Next Irish Export to Trouble the A-List. but Far from Hell-Raising, He Says He's a Good Catholic Boy Who Still Goes to Mass
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.