AULD REEKIE REELS THEM IN; It Began as a Showcase for Some Worthy Films the Edinburgh Film Festival Has Grown into Documenting Life in Post-War Britain, but in the Past 65 Years a Glittering Celebration of Star Talent from around the World

Daily Mail (London), June 18, 2011 | Go to article overview

AULD REEKIE REELS THEM IN; It Began as a Showcase for Some Worthy Films the Edinburgh Film Festival Has Grown into Documenting Life in Post-War Britain, but in the Past 65 Years a Glittering Celebration of Star Talent from around the World


Byline: by Jim McBeth

IN the days before a television sat in every living room, when the word 'documentary' was confined to Her Majesty's Courts, the Edinburgh Film Festival presented brilliant black-and-white visions by pioneering film-makers such as John Grierson.

The 'documentary' movement offered a unique snapshot of Britain in the post-war era, presenting cheery, everyday folk who, whatever their qualities, were not nearly as glamorous as Sienna Miller, Charlize Theron, Keira Knightley or Sigourney Weaver.

It is not on record what Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg or Sir Sean Connery would have made of Grierson's steam trains or his vignette on the arrival of spring in England, but from such worthy beginnings the festival evolved to include their own more popular offerings at the longest-running event of its kind in the world.

Since the 1950s, when the festival expanded to include 'fiction film', it has been graced by acting luminaries such as Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor and directors of the calibre of John Huston, Sam Fuller, Douglas Sirk and the young Scorsese. And now that the EFF has achieved senior citizen status, it can reflect on decades during which it has been ahead of the game in recognising the burgeoning talents of top film-makers such as Spielberg, The who work the Festival ranging chief Mullighan manager Mike Leigh and Peter Jackson of Lord Of The Rings fame.

Now the 65th Edinburgh Film Festival is under way in the capital, still at the cutting edge with presentations of classic films, documentaries and more 26 number of staff hard to bring Edinburgh Film to life every year, from the event's executive James to box office Richard Moore than 60 international movies and documentaries made by the best directors and actors in the world.

Festival director James Mullighan says: 'The EFF has grasped the opportunity and necessity to have a long look at itself. It is thrusting its chin out, boldly reinventing itself and taking the first steps to the future.

'There are now more than 2,000 film festivals globally, and we are paying fresh mind to the historic and cultural reputation of our glorious home town. We want to help shout "Edinburgh" even louder to the world.' The festival, which grew out of the Edinburgh Film Guild and went on to define every event of its kind, began in 1947 alongside the Edinburgh International Festival.

Its first remit was to bring the burgeoning British documentary movement to a wider audience and it was championed by Grierson, the founder of the genre.

The year in capital inaugural Film Festival.

Early audiences flocked to see films by Grierson, Roberto Rossellini, Humphrey Jennings and Robert Flaherty. As the festival's reputation grew in the 1950s, it expanded into the mainstream.

of the first events of its held the One of its first big stars was the internationally acclaimed Scottish director Alexander McKendrick, who helmed such classics as Whisky Galore, The Ladykillers and The Sweet Smell of Success. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

AULD REEKIE REELS THEM IN; It Began as a Showcase for Some Worthy Films the Edinburgh Film Festival Has Grown into Documenting Life in Post-War Britain, but in the Past 65 Years a Glittering Celebration of Star Talent from around the World
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.