Make Plans for Atlanta: NABT Professional Development Conference

The American Biology Teacher, November-December 2006 | Go to article overview

Make Plans for Atlanta: NABT Professional Development Conference


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November 28 - December 1, 2007

The Atlanta Hyatt Regency * Atlanta, Georgia

Atlanta, the "big city with lots of Southern hospitality," will be the site of NABT's 2007 Professional Development Conference. We'd like to extend a warm "Southern Welcome" to visit Atlanta and attend this exciting event. Past Conference attendees know that an NABT Conference has it all: dynamic speakers, stimulating sessions and symposia, wonderful workshops, and exciting exhibits; covering everything from bird flu to bioterrorism, from forensics to fossils.

Situated in the northwest part of the state at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains near the Chattahoochee River, Atlanta's first European settler was Hardy Ivy, who built a cabin there in 1833. Founded as Terminus in 1837, the town served as the end of the Georgia railroad line (Western and Atlantic Railroad) and later became incorporated as Marthasville in 1843 in honor of ex-governor Lumpkin's daughter Martha. It was renamed Atlanta in 1845 and incorporated as a city in 1847. The name was suggested by the railroad's chief engineer, J. Edgar Thomson, and was derived from its location at the end of the Georgia and Atlantic railroad line. The city became the capital of Georgia in 1868.

During the Civil War, the city was burned and almost completely destroyed while occupied by Gen. William T. Sherman's troops in November 1864. It was rebuilt after the war and grew rapidly due to the expansion of the railroads in the Southwest.

Today, Atlanta is the major commercial and transportation hub of the southeast United States, and its international airport is one of the busiest in the world. …

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