UN.. DEUX.. TROIS.. KATE; Duchess Learns French for Canada Tour

The Mirror (London, England), June 23, 2011 | Go to article overview

UN.. DEUX.. TROIS.. KATE; Duchess Learns French for Canada Tour


Byline: VICTORIA MURPHY

THE Duchess of Cambridge will prove she has that certain "je ne sais quoi" - by wowing French speakers with the royal oui.

Kate, left, has gone on a crash course to brush up on the language in time for her visit to Quebec with Prince William.

They will spend two days in the French-speaking province in Canada as part of their tour of North America.

Sources say Kate embarked on her "merci mission" to make a good impression on her first major royal trip.

An insider said yesterday: "This is a big occasion and Kate is busy preparing. There is a lot of behind-thescenes work that goes into getting ready for a tour and Kate doesn't want to leave anything to chance.

"She and William already have some knowledge of French but they are keen to brush up as much as possible before they go. She is also learning about the places they will visit and the people and organisations they will meet.

There is a lot to take in."

Kate has been swotting up with help from a team on both sides of the Atlantic including adviser Sir David Manning. …

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