Sporran Partners; Who Should Play Outlander Hero.Gerard or Ewan?

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), June 25, 2011 | Go to article overview

Sporran Partners; Who Should Play Outlander Hero.Gerard or Ewan?


Byline: Samantha Booth

AMERICAN author Diana Gabaldon's Outlander books have sold more than 18million copies and been translated into 19 languages. The internet is full of forums and fanzines dedicated to her characters and a new graphic novel, out this year, retells the story of the first Outlander book. Now there is talk of a movie starring Gerard Butler as Outlander's main character, dashing Highlander Jamie Fraser. Diana has created the kind of man most women dream of - a tall, strapping warrior who embodies the Scottish character. But does Gerard measure up? Samantha Booth investigates.

WHEN it comes to casting a film star to play Outlander hero Jamie Fraser, many of his female fans reckon Gerard Butler would be perfect.

Author Diana Gabaldon is not so sure ... she prefers his rival Ewan McGregor. She said: "Everyone always wants to know about the film and who I think would make the perfect Jamie.

"While a film is a very real possibility, I don't think it is the best idea to pick an actor who I think looks like Jamie.

"That's why there are casting directors who can bring the role to life and embody the character. That means you need a really good actor, such as Ewan McGregor, to play the part.

"I don't know exactly when the film might come about because I am being quite careful about which companies I offer the book to.

"I want someone who will do a good job, someone who has read the book and understands it."

Outlander starts with a young nurse visiting Inverness on honeymoon after World War II.

Somehow she falls through a set of standing stones and finds herself in 18th-century Scotland, a country ripped apart by rebellion.

herself in 18th-century Scotland, a country ripped apart by rebellion.

She meets and falls in love with young Jacobite soldier Jamie Fraser.

She meets and falls in love with young Jacobite soldier Jamie Fraser.

They do their best to stay alive in an increasingly dangerous land.

They do their best to stay alive in an increasingly dangerous land.

Incredibly, the creation of Jamie Fraser was almost accidental.

Incredibly, the creation of Jamie Fraser was almost accidental.

Diana, a zoologist, marine biologist and former university professor, started writing a novel in secret just to see if she could do it.

Diana, a zoologist, marine biologist and former university professor, started writing a novel in secret just to see if she could do it.

For years, she had written as part of her academic studies and later for computer magazines.

For years, she had written as part of her academic studies and later for computer magazines.

But, having always wanted to be a novelist as a child, she started jotting down bits and pieces of the novel that was to become Outlander.

But, having always wanted to be a novelist as a child, she started jotting down bits and pieces of the novel that was to become Outlander.

After having watched an old episode of Dr Who which featured a young Highlander, she decided to include a kilted warrior in her book. The rest, as they say, is history.

After having watched an old episode of Dr Who which featured a young Highlander, she decided to include a kilted warrior in her book. The rest, as they say, is history.

Diana said: "I knew I wanted to write something historical, but I didn't know where it would be set. …

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