Energy Policy That Is Stupid and So Cruel

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), June 26, 2011 | Go to article overview

Energy Policy That Is Stupid and So Cruel


Byline: by Lisa Buckingham EDITOR, FINANCIAL MAIL

Even in the Alice in Wonderland world of this country's energy policy, it is still jawdropping that we are discussing spending [pounds sterling]10 billion on new gas-fired power stations to have on standby for when the wind doesn't blow hard enough to ensure our new generation of windmills keeps the lights on.

As Financial Mail has frequently reported, the heavily subsidised windmills now dotting our countryside tend to stop working at times of high pressure - usually when it's coldest - because the wind does not blow.

It is all very well to have grandiose ambitions to be the planet's greenest nation, but it looks rather silly if we then have to build not-so-green gas-fired generating kit to cover for the down days.

Not only is it silly, it is cruel as the cost of all this subsidised and badly thought-out power building is being paid by households, increasing numbers of whom are living in fuel poverty.

Don't we have a watchdog to keep profiteering by energy companies in check? Well, sort of. Last week going cost at Ofgem boss Alistair Buchanan flexed his muscles, bared his teeth, stared fiercely at energy bosses and...yet again ducked calling in the Competition Commission.

He has finally backed Financial Mail's calls for simpler tariffs to make it easier for customers to swap suppliers and he is talking about forcing the majors to auction about 20 per cent of their supplies to allow independents to come into the market.

Buchanan also plans a detailed audit of the internal trading prices charged by those companies that both generate fuel and then retail it. He scents there may be some price manipulation going on.

A poll by British Gas owner Centrica suggests consumers are prepared to pay about [pounds sterling]100 extra a year to go green. The reality is that in a few short years this will be costing at least [pounds sterling]600 of an average [pounds sterling]2,000 annual bill. That is before any extra charges for the standby gas plants.

FINANCIAL Mail readers have been angry - rightly so - about the failures of the banking system.

But the correspondence we have received has, by and large, been reasoned and considered about the banks' historical failings, with intelligent and reasoned suggestions for improving governance in the future. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Energy Policy That Is Stupid and So Cruel
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.