E-Sources on Women & Gender

By Lehman, JoAnne | Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women's Studies Resources, Fall 2009 | Go to article overview

E-Sources on Women & Gender


Lehman, JoAnne, Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women's Studies Resources


Our website (http://womenst.library.wisc.edu/) includes recent editions of this column and links to complete back issues of Feminist Collections, plus many bibliographies, a database of women-focused videos, and links to hundreds of other websites by topic.

Information about electronic journals and magazines, particularly those with numbered or dated issues posted on a regular schedule, can be found in our "Periodical Notes" column.

ARCHIVES, BLOGS, DIRECTORIES, PORTALS ...

The U.S. government's ARCHIVES LIBRARY INFORMATION CENTER (ALIC) offers "a listing of historical websites relevant to women in the United States" at http://archives.gov/research/alic/reference/womens-history.htinl. Current categories are "Bibliographies," "African-American Women," "Biographies," "Politics and Women," "Women's Suffrage," "Women in the Military," and "Other Resources on the Web," including an archive of speeches made by influential women around the world, Duke University's archive on Civil War women, and the website of our own Women's Studies Librarian's Office.

Everything's coming up Google ... Sure, you knew that, but did you know that you can do targeted searches for resources on gender issues in GOOGLE DIRECTORY, where categories are edited by real people? Start at http://directory.google.com/; pick "Society" and then "People" from the categories that show up on the screen. From here, you've got choices that include "Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual," "Men," "Transgendered," and "Women," and each of those sub-sub-categories is searchable. (For more about the "edited by live humans" Open Directory Project, see http://www.dmoz.org/about.html.)

Launched on International Women's Day 2009, the "interactive network portal" GRASSROOTS FEMINISM: TRANSNATIONAL ARCHIVES, RESOURCES AND COMMUNITIES at http://www.grassrootsfeminism.net was described in a press release as "a new and unique feminist meeting point." The site is maintained by activists in Austria, England, and Sweden; anyone can join the community and post to its blogs.

The HERSTORY SCRAPBOOK links to 900 archived pieces in The New York Times covering the final four years of the women's suffrage battle (leading up to the 1920 presidential election): http://www.herstoryscrapbook.com. Unfortunately, you can't read the actual archived articles unless you are a paying NYT subscriber or are willing to purchase individual pieces. Even so, there's useful material on the scrapbook site, including the current "HerStory 360[degrees] Challenge": for the first 90 days of 2010, a new story will be posted every day about a key woman in the suffrage campaign: "90 stories about 90 women over 90 days to commemorate the 90th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment."

The thirty-six employees profiled so far on the LATINA WOMEN OF NASA website are engineers of all stripes, information technology specialists, program analysts, electronics designers, executives, and researchers. They include a microbiologist, a secretary, and, yes, an astronaut (Dr. Ellen Ochoa). Read about them at http://oeop.larc.nasa.gov/hep/lwon/.

"Welcome to the SISTERSPACE," writes Kimberly Seals Allers, editorial director of the Black Maternal Health project at Women's eNews, and "prepare yourself for a groundbreaking conversation about our health and our lives as black women and mothers." Allers has been posting to her new blog at http://womensenews.org/sisterspace since October 2009, commenting on such topics as breastfeeding, parenting an infant, domestic violence during pregnancy, pregnancy while single, pregnancy and the flu, foremothers who were slaves, and a mother's anxieties about giving birth to a son in a society where the odds are stacked against young black males.

The first thing you're likely to encounter on WOMENSLAW's resource for women experiencing domestic violence (http://www.womenslaw.org) is a comprehensive and highly understandable guide to Internet security, or, more to the point here, how to keep your abuser from monitoring your computer use or reading or interfering with your email. …

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