Visit a Park Day 2011: Citizens and Students Participate at Parks across the Country

By Bradley, Michael | Parks & Recreation, June 2011 | Go to article overview

Visit a Park Day 2011: Citizens and Students Participate at Parks across the Country


Bradley, Michael, Parks & Recreation


I WONDER IF MANY PEOPLE HAVE EVER LOOKED in their rearview mirror in complete awe of their recent memories. I cannot say enough about the successes from 2011. A little over a year ago, I thought I had made a mistake in taking on the Visit a Park Day project. Linda Oakleaf, a former student branch chair, had the fantastic idea of creating a day designed to spark curiosity and wonderment in the park setting.

The beginnings of Visit a Park Day were stellar; Linda succeeded in capturing a national audience and procuring various groups to participate in a wide range of activities. Was I really the person to nurture this idea into 2011? As I told a colleague, I might have bitten off more than I could chew. Only with the help of various members of NRPA's Young Professional Network was I able to further the mission of such a great idea and help the 2011 Visit a Park Day see success.

Visit a Park Day's purposes for students and community members are fourfold, including increasing park attendance, providing service and learning opportunities, fostering and creating lasting park relationships, and exposing the parks to various marginalized populations. This year, several programs across the United States recruited hundreds of individuals to facilitate and participate in Visit a Park Day. Groups in Champaign, Illinois; Raleigh, North Carolina; Rockford, Illinois; and so many more poured their efforts into a variety of programming and organized recreation to help make the event a success.

Various nonprofit organizations such as the North American Association for Environmental Education, The Boys and Girls Clubs, various state NRPA-affiliated agencies, a multitude of university and college groups, and many other groups aided in distributing information through an array of media sources. Agencies used online media sources like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google, newspaper sites, and other websites to spread the word about the event. Many organizations formed online groups to recruit volunteers and participants for their events.

For the second straight year, leaders of various groups exceeded expectations for the event. More groups facilitated more programs. More volunteers and workers created successful events. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Visit a Park Day 2011: Citizens and Students Participate at Parks across the Country
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.