Running through the Off-Beaten Tracks

Manila Bulletin, July 3, 2011 | Go to article overview

Running through the Off-Beaten Tracks


MANILA, Philippines -- As people become adept at a certain activity or sport, some of them develop a certain level of brashness that goes with the territory. What used to be worthwhile exercises become boring and plain overtime. This makes sense since continuous practice makes something easier. This is precisely why people begin thinking out of the box and incorporating extremes into their activities.

Take running for example; road running has become an extremely popular sport with running events being held almost every week to feed the people's need to apply what they prepared for. However, running can become quite mundane for some that's why there are those who look for something more, something that keeps the blood curdling and tummies tingling with excitement.

Enter trail running. Although trail running isn't a new sport, it's certainly a significant twist from the conventional running practices. As the name suggests, the activity consists of running through trails that go through different terrains like hills, mountains, forests, and narrow passages which involves steep inclines and rough landscapes unlike conventional running which is limited to roads.

"Mas refreshing ang trail running compared to road running. It's pollution free and the view is always pleasant, kumbaga tanggal ang pagod at mas malinis ang sistema mo," shares adventure sports athlete and Merrell ambassador Thumbie Remigio.

Although the discipline is the same since both basically involve running, trail running differs from road running because it offers new dynamics to the sport. Because the activity requires navigating through different obstacles, it also demands more assertive movements. "More muscles are activated in trail running because there are lateral movements and jumping involved. So, iba din yung sakit ng katawan," Remigio explains.

Aside from the physical aspect, the activity also differs in terms of the constant focus required just to get through a run. "What's good about trail running is you're running and thinking at the same time. …

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