The Panalization of Media and Tech: Fanfare, Fame ... Fatigue?

By Heussner, Ki Mae | ADWEEK, June 27, 2011 | Go to article overview

The Panalization of Media and Tech: Fanfare, Fame ... Fatigue?


Heussner, Ki Mae, ADWEEK


Another day, another panel. Or at least that's how it started to feel this spring when it was conference galore for the technorati. In New York, in between breakfast summits sponsored by Google and cocktail receptions hosted by Facebook, they were rushing off to panels on all manner of tech topics. Privacy and marketing. The future of apps. Location, location, location. The meetings industry might have taken a hit with the recession, but if the rise of media and tech conferences across the country is any indication, it's making a healthy return. In California, snow sports enthusiasts host a "Snowcial." In Atlanta, social media-savvy pet lovers plan to gather for BarkWorld later this year. There's even a conference called Sex::Tech (for sexual health, new media, and youth). But while the crush of confabs may create no shortage of tweetworthy comments and keynote superstars, by the time peak panel season winds down, even the most eager conferee is ready for a break. If you can stand it, take a look at a few panel-specific data points and personalities above.

Soraya Darabi

co-founder of Foodspotting, digital strategist at ABC News

Between her dual high-profile gigs, you'd think Darabi has enough on her plate. But when it comes to panels, she seems to have no problem making time. Her tally for the past year is already in the double digits, with five appearances during this February's Social Media Week alone.

Baratunde Thurston

director of digital for The Onion

If he weren't so funny, we'd almost be tired of him, But Thurston's humor has helped tide over many a panel-weary conferee until happy hour. He's appeared around the country speaking about comedy, politics, and creativity on the Web. …

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