The DSK Brouhaha


After weeks of shocking revelations and stunning reversals, the Dominique Strauss-Kahn soap opera staggers on. It's getting hard to tell the victims from the villains. What are the major players saying now?

Tristane Banon

More than eight years ago, the then-23-year-old French writer interviewed DSK for her first book, Admitted Mistakes. The lissome blonde bragged she got her interviews by acting "falsely naive," but she also said privately that DSK had tried to rape her. In 2007 she told the story on television. It sank without a trace. Last week Banon filed a formal complaint in the French courts, sparking a formal probe. Strauss-Kahn denies wrongdoing.

Cyrus Vance jr.

The district attorney's office rushed to judgment, or at least to an indictment, leaving little time to examine the maid's history and connections. DSK was perp-walked and his case taken to a grand jury in just five days. Now it looks like he'll settle for a plea bargain or fold altogether. He's refused the accuser's lawyer's request for a special prosecutor, but if he doesn't redeem himself, voters may take him out of office anyway.

Hotel Maids

Although the housekeeper's bio is sketchy, the essentials have won her sympathy: a black, single mother of a teenage girl; a refugee immigrant struggling to put down roots in America; a hardworking employee abused by wealthy clients. No wonder her union in New York City turned out scores of workers to publicly shame DSK, while across the country others began to share their own stories of abuse, and lobby for protection. …

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