Take the Bite out of Sports Injuries

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 13, 2011 | Go to article overview

Take the Bite out of Sports Injuries


Byline: Janice Youngwith

Accidents happen. But if you're the parent of one of the 30 million kids under 14 who participate in organized youth sports, simple preventive steps can help save your child's smile and keep them off the injured list.

"Dental and facial injuries represent a high percentage of total injuries experienced in youth sports," says Dr. Sonia Gutierrez, a board-certified pediatric dentist affiliated with Kids Dentist in Grayslake.

"From soccer and football fields to baseball diamonds, basketball courts and even the cheerleading sidelines, it's always better to prevent an injury than to try and repair one."

The National Youth Sports Foundation for Safety reports that dental injuries are the most common type of oral facial injury sustained when kids play sports and more than 5 million teeth are knocked out each year during the course of games and competition.

"Nearly 80 percent of these injuries involve the upper front teeth," explains Gutierrez, who says if a tooth does get knocked out, it's best to act quickly.

"Examine the tooth and if clean, try to put it back in the mouth. If it's dirty, do not rinse. Place it in milk as soon as possible and only touch the crown. Roots can be damaged by touch and less manipulation is best. Take your child and the tooth immediately to the dentist, preferably within 20 to 30 minutes."

Whether elite athletes or simply shooting hoops in the driveway, children are more susceptible to injury than adults. Kids ages 5 to 14 account for nearly 40 percent of all sports-related injuries.

"Taking sports safety precautions can help keep your child in the game," says Gutierrez, who says accidents from sports and outdoor activities are almost as common for kids as cavities.

To keep your child's dental safety in check, she recommends following sport-specific guidelines when it comes to safety gear and encouraging young athletes to wear a custom-fit or boil-and-bite style mouthguard for sports like football, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, basketball, baseball and field hockey. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Take the Bite out of Sports Injuries
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.