Nurse in Forgery Case Is Set Free; Qualification Faked

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), July 16, 2011 | Go to article overview

Nurse in Forgery Case Is Set Free; Qualification Faked


Byline: SOPHIE DOUGHTY

A NURSE jailed after getting a job based on qualifications forged by her husband has been freed on appeal.

Susan Kelly started working at a Newcastle NHS walkin centre in Byker, after claiming she had a degree in health studies and a teaching qualification.

But an internal investigation revealed although she was a qualified nurse, she had dropped out of her degree and never did the teaching qualification.

Kelly, 45, was locked up for eight months after admitting fraud, while her forger husband, Mark Darren Kelly, got a suspended prison sentence, in May. But now, judges at London's Court of Appeal have suspended her sentence after hearing that her career as a nurse is probably over.

Lord Justice Moses, sitting with Mr Justice Holroyde, and Judge Francis Gilbert QC, said yesterday: "It is a very sad case. What she did was incredibly serious."

But Judge Gilbert said: "She is said to be thoroughly ashamed and upset by what she has done.

"It is out opinion that the sentence ought to have been suspended given the mitigation and the low risk of reoffending."

Newcastle Crown Court heard the fake certificates, which were riddled with errors and spelling mistakes, were uncovered after an investigation was launched in response to concerns about Kelly's attendance and performances.

The probe revealed the nurse dropped out of her degree after the first year.

And when asked to produce proof of her qualifications, she presented documents forged using a scanner. …

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