A Graced and Effective Word

National Catholic Reporter, June 24, 2011 | Go to article overview

A Graced and Effective Word


JULY 10, 2011, FIFTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Patricia Datchuck Sanchez

Is 55:10-11; Ps 65; Rom 8:18-23; Mt 13:1-23

According to an anecdote preserved among the French, Napoleon Bona parte (1769-1821) was once reviewing some troops in Paris when he carelessly dropped the bridle on his horse's neck. Instantly, the animal set off at a gallop, while Bonaparte clung to the saddle lest he fall to his death. One of the foot soldiers broke ranks and sprang before the horse, seized the bridle and handed it to the unnerved Bonaparte, who said, "Much obliged to you, Captain!" With just a word, the man who made himself emperor had made the soldier an officer. The new captain saluted and responded, "Of what regiment, sire?" Napoleon replied, "Of my Guards!" and galloped off.

With that, the soldier approached a group of officers. One of the generals asked what he wanted. "I am the Captain of the Guard," said the soldier, proudly. "You, mon ami, are mad to say this!" came the retort. "But, he said so," replied the soldier, pointing to the emperor, who was still in sight. The general respectfully begged the soldier's pardon--the emperor's word was sufficient.

The anecdote leads us to ask ourselves: If the word of a French ruler was so respected, how much more does the Word of God command our respect and attention? If the word of an imperfect human being could transform a person's status in life, how much more can the word of God transform the lives of those who hear it and heed it? If a soldier could become bold and daring because of a word spoken by his commander in chief, how might the word of God embolden and strengthen each of us as we allow that word to be a living reality in our lives?

Fully convinced of the power of God's word, the prophet known as Deutero-lsaiah (first reading) wished to share this conviction with his embattled contemporaries. During the exile in Babylonia, the prophet had kept the word of God resounding in their hearts with promises of comfort, reconciliation and a new beginning. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Graced and Effective Word
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.