Beijing Develops Pulse Weapons; Blasts Thwart All Electronics

By Gertz, Bill | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 22, 2011 | Go to article overview

Beijing Develops Pulse Weapons; Blasts Thwart All Electronics


Gertz, Bill, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Bill Gertz, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

China's military is developing electromagnetic pulse weapons that Beijing plans to use against U.S. aircraft carriers in any future conflict over Taiwan, according to an intelligence report made public on Thursday.

Portions of a National Ground Intelligence Center study on the lethal effects of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and high-powered microwave (HPM) weapons revealed that the arms are part of China's so-called assassin's mace arsenal - weapons that allow a technologically inferior China to defeat U.S. military forces.

EMP weapons mimic the gamma-ray pulse caused by a nuclear blast that knocks out all electronics, including computers and automobiles, over wide areas. The phenomenon was discovered in 1962 after an aboveground nuclear test in the Pacific disabled electronics in Hawaii.

The declassified intelligence report, obtained by the private National Security Archive, provides details on China's EMP weapons and plans for their use. Annual Pentagon reports on China's military in the past made only passing references to the arms.

"For use against Taiwan, China could detonate at a much lower altitude (30 to 40 kilometers) ..

to confine the EMP effects to Taiwan and its immediate vicinity and minimize damage to electronics on the mainland," the report said

The report, produced in 2005 and once labeled secret, stated that Chinese military writings have discussed building low-yield EMP warheads, but it is not known whether [the Chinese] have actually done so.

The report said that in addition to EMP weapons, any low-yield strategic nuclear warhead (or tactical nuclear warheads) could be used with similar effects.

The DF-21 medium-range ballistic missile has been mentioned as a platform for the EMP attack against Taiwan, the report said.

According to the report, China's electronic weapons are part of what are called trump card or assassin's mace weapons that are based on new technology that has been developed in high secrecy.

Trump card would be applicable if the Chinese have developed new low-yield, possibly enhanced, EMP warheads, while assassin's mace would apply if older warheads are employed, the report said.

According to the report, China conducted EMP tests on mice, rats, rabbits, dogs and monkeys that produced eye, brain, bone marrow and other organ injuries. It stated that it is clear the real purpose of the Chinese medical experiments is to learn the potential human effects of exposure to powerful EMP and [high-powered microwave] radiation.

The tests did not appear designed for anti-personnel [radio frequency] weapons because of the limited amounts of radiation used.

However, the report said another explanation is that the Chinese tests may have been research intended primarily for torturing prisoners, or the tests may have been conducted to determine safety or shielding standards for military personnel or weapons.

The medical research also appeared useful for China's military in making sure that EMP weapons used against Taiwan and any vulnerable U.S. [aircraft carrier] would not push the U.S. across the nuclear-response threshold, the report said. …

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