Richmond's Journey-to-Work Transit Trip-Making Analysis

By Chen, Xueming; Suen, I-Shian | Management Research and Practice, September 2010 | Go to article overview

Richmond's Journey-to-Work Transit Trip-Making Analysis


Chen, Xueming, Suen, I-Shian, Management Research and Practice


1. INTRODUCTION

Richmond is the capital city of the Commonwealth of Virginia with a long history dating back to the early 17th century. Richmond and its surrounding counties (Hanover County, Henrico County, Town of Ashland, City of Richmond, a majority of Chesterfield County, portions of Charles City County, Goochland County, New Kent County, and Powhatan County)

form the Richmond metropolitan region (Figure 1), which had a total population of 822,416 and a total employment of 617,578 in year 2000.

Though being touted as the first U.S. city with an electric trolley-powered streetcars operating during 18881949, Richmond is currently facing a challenge in its bus-dominated transit system operation. Among others, the following issues seem evident: increasing incompatibility of the existing hub-and-spoke transit network with the future travel pattern due to the on-going suburbanization movement (Figure 2), lack of transit services in some high transit-demand areas (Figure 3), absence of high-capacity transit facilities along key corridors, and limited funding/jurisdictional support for upgrading transit services. Because of these issues, the transit modal share has been declining in Richmond. According to the Richmond Regional Planning District Commission (2008), the number of commuters that drove alone to work rose from 78% modal share in 1990 to 82% modal share in 2000. In contrast, the percentage of public transit use declined from 4% in 1990 to 2% in 2000.

In order to deal with these issues, local transit and planning agencies recently prepared both short-range and long-range transit plans. For example, the Greater Richmond Transit Company (GRTC) completed its most recent update of the Comprehensive Operations Analysis (COA) in March 2008 with a list of service improvement recommendations ranging from optimizing bus routes, building transfer centers, and launching a bus rapid transit line along Broad Street. Based on GRTC's COA, the Richmond Regional Planning District Commission (RRPDC) also finished its final technical report of the Richmond Regional Mass Transit Study (RRMTS) in May 2008. Concurrently, RRPDC collaborated with the Urban and Regional Planning Program at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and conducted transit-oriented development (TOD) studies along the region's key transportation corridors. All of the above plans include very detailed and comprehensive transit analyses based on their intensive surveys and data collection efforts. Because of that, they will surely guide Richmond's future transit planning.

The above studies identified a wide range of factors influencing residents' use of transit services. However, they fell short of identifying the most significant factors and their relative impacts on transit trip-making. To fill this void, this study employs multivariate regression and cluster analyses to examine the journey-to-work transit trip-making in Richmond. The following sections describe the research methodology, present and discuss findings of the analyses, and conclude with recommendations about transit service improvement.

2. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

This study intends to complement existing transit plans by conducting a rigorous statistical analysis on the socioeconomic/transit variables affecting Richmond's journey-to-work transit trip-making. Following the multivariate regression and cluster analyses, a professional judgment is exercised in interpreting those analytical results, from which conclusions and recommendations are drawn.

2.1. Data Sources

The principal data source is the year 2000 Census Transportation Planning Package (CTPP): Part I (At Place of Residence) and Part II (At Place of Work). Since most GRTC fixed-route bus transit services are provided within the City of Richmond and about 86% of the GRTC riders are Richmond residents according to the 2007 household survey conducted by GRTC (2008), only those transportation analysis zones (TAZs) within the City boundary are included for analysis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Richmond's Journey-to-Work Transit Trip-Making Analysis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.