Is Japan's Rise in Suicide Rates an Omen for U.S.? from the Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association

By Otto, M. Alexander | Clinical Psychiatry News, June 2011 | Go to article overview

Is Japan's Rise in Suicide Rates an Omen for U.S.? from the Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association


Otto, M. Alexander, Clinical Psychiatry News


HONOLULU - Economic crisis in the United States could lead to an increase in suicides if U.S. trends follow the pattern in Japan during that country's economic downturn a decade ago, according to Dr. William R. Yates and his colleagues.

If the U.S. experience does mirror that of Japan, Dr. Yates and his colleagues project an increase of more than 14,500 suicides per year in the United States. The Japanese experience suggests that almost 90% of the increase would occur among men, Dr. Yates reported in a poster presentation at the meeting.

Right now, the U.S. economic outlook parallels Japan's in the late 1990s, with increased unemployment, a burst housing bubble, and a troubled stock market, said Dr. Yates, lead author of the analysis. As unemployment increased 50% in Japan between 1998 and 1999, suicide rates increased 23.1% among women and 47.3% among men. Men over 50 were especially hard hit. Unemployment and divorce were the first and second leading psychosocial factors, one of Dr. Yates's Japanese colleagues found. Better suicide reporting did not seem to account for the increase in deaths.

Clinicians should be aware that a similar scenario could occur in the United States - or could already be happening if a recent increase in baby-boomer suicides is any indication, said Dr. Yates, who is affiliated with the University of Oklahoma department of psychiatry in Tulsa and is a former department chairman. Indeed, a recent study shows a connection between U.S. suicide rates and business cycles (Am. J. Public Health 2011; 101:1139-46).

"We are not necessarily saying this will occur, but if it should, these would be the patterns that might be seen," he said. "We know psychiatric illness is the primary determinant of suicide, but psychosocial factors can influence overall rates."

To arrive at their figures, Dr. Yates and his colleagues compared economic trends in the United States and Japan, and applied Japanese suicide rates during the downturn to U.S. population figures based on the 2010 Census. "The baseline number of suicides in the U.S. average around 33,000 per year," Dr. Yates wrote in a blog about his poster.

"If suicide rates were to increase to the magnitude found in Japan, the number of increased suicides in the U.S. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Is Japan's Rise in Suicide Rates an Omen for U.S.? from the Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.