Manners Matter in Kids' Etiquette Class; Children Learn in Fine-Dining Setting at Ritz-Carlton

By Andres, Shakaya | The Florida Times Union, July 28, 2011 | Go to article overview

Manners Matter in Kids' Etiquette Class; Children Learn in Fine-Dining Setting at Ritz-Carlton


Andres, Shakaya, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Shakaya Andres

Valerie Anderson thinks proper etiquette skills are becoming extinct among children.

Whether that's because of a lack of parental guidance or the influence of cell phones and the Internet, she's not sure. But when she learned that the Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island, where she was vacationing last week from Ohio, was putting on a dining etiquette class for children, she signed up her three kids.

"I think manners have gone by the wayside," Anderson said. "It's good to start young. Sometimes it's easier to have someone else reinforce things."

The children were taught to introduce themselves properly, shake hands and engage in polite conversation while dining.

Nineteen children from Ohio, Georgia, North and South Florida, ages 6-12, participated in the 2 '-hour course in the Ritz-Carlton's restaurant Salt, where a long table was formally set in the dining room. The girls wore colorful sundresses and the boys wore polo shirts and khakis.

Before the course began, the children were asked to form a line single file, where they walked quietly behind Chef de Cuisine Richard Laughlin to the kitchen. He showed the children the areas in the kitchen where the main courses are made, the pastry area and the private dining area behind a glass window located in the kitchen (that's a place where up to four guests watch the chefs prepare their meal and dine).

The children's three-course meal included chilled potato soup with cheddar cheese, crispy potatoes and bacon as the first course. The second course was roasted organic chicken breast with wild rice and summer vegetables. For dessert, a vanilla creme brulee with berries on a short bread cookie was served.

"We're making the food very likable, something they'd like," Laughlin said.

After the kitchen tour, the children were escorted to the dining room, where etiquette expert Suzanne Willis of Sarasota taught them how to introduce themselves and how to address adults properly.

"Most of the time when you meet an adult you'd call them by their last name [like] Ms. Willis, not their first until they tell you it's OK," she told the children. "You can call me Ms. Suzanne."

The children practiced and when they sat down, the boys pulled out chairs for the girls.

Then, it was time for the children to learn how to eat bread. They were instructed to scoop butter from a dish onto their plates, break a "bite size" piece of bread and butter it one piece at a time, using the butter on their plate.

As the three-course lunch was brought out to the table, Willis explained to the children which utensils they were to use first.

"Eat from the outside and work your way in," she said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Manners Matter in Kids' Etiquette Class; Children Learn in Fine-Dining Setting at Ritz-Carlton
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.