Marriage Mindset: Presume the Best

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

Marriage Mindset: Presume the Best


Byline: Rebecca Hagelin, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Culture Challenge of the Week: Marital Criticism and Pessimism

He's a good dad to our kids, but was always criticizing me, Terry complained. I couldn't do anything right, in his mind at least. Thirteen years was enough. I figured it would only get worse, so I left.

Like most marriages that end in divorce, Terry's marriage began happily enough. It ended not because of a serious transgression such as adultery, abuse or substance use, but because the couple's personal relationship deteriorated and they gave up. They gave in to two marriage-killing habits: criticism and pessimism.

A number of years ago, marriage expert John Gottman identified four relationship patterns that can doom a marriage: criticism, defensiveness, stonewalling and contempt. When any of those patterns predominate during conflict resolution, the marriage is in trouble - as Terry experienced.

Criticism is particularly insidious, because couples do need to identify faults and problems to work on them. But good communication never takes aim at the other person - it sticks to facts When you didn't call last night to tell me you'd be late .. ) and feelings . it made me feel sad and angry. ) and avoids judgment You're so inconsiderate and uncaring. ).

For marriage to work, however, good communication habits aren't enough. Faith in the big picture of your relationship is important, too. Losing hope that marriage can work - and that your spouse means well - can feed a downward spiral.

It's all too common in our divorce culture: Struggling couples lose confidence in their ability to make their marriage successful. Pessimism begets more pessimism until divorce seems inevitable. That scenario is even more likely when a couple's own parents ended up divorced or failed to provide a realistic model of a happy marriage.

How to Save Your Family: Stoke the Fires of Marital Optimism

New research shows that the happiest marriages reflect an overall positive attitude about the goodness of the other person and the marriage itself - even as the couple works to resolves conflicts. …

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