Getting 50 Cent's Worth; Men's Body Image Clipped by Music Videos

Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia), August 6, 2011 | Go to article overview

Getting 50 Cent's Worth; Men's Body Image Clipped by Music Videos


Byline: RAE WILSON

CHECKING out ripped bods as research for this story was hard work.

A quick Google image search can make a girl reach for a fan to cool down.

Think 50 Cent (pictured), Robbie Williams, Enrique Iglesias.

The effect on men, however, is a little more serious.

Watching music video clips with muscly and attractive men can actually increase their anger and depression levels.

University of the Sunshine Coast psychology lecturer Kate Mulgrew, who specialises in body image and eating disorders, said there had been plenty of public debate about the portrayal of women in modern music video clips but not much research into the effects of video clips on men.

Her study into the latter, which involved 90 men watching five video clips of male singers, was presented at the university's research conference this month.

aThirty men were exposed to music video clips with muscly and attractive men, 30 were exposed to clips containing images of average-looking men a like Coldplay and 30 Seconds to Mars a and 30 watched video clips that had few people, just scenery, digital effects or animations,a she told the Daily.

aThey completed some questionnaires that had a look of their mood and body image before the clips and then after the clips.

aWhat we found was clear-cut findings that exposure to the music video clips with muscly and attractive men produced an immediate reduction in mood and body image which we didn't find that in any other conditions (groups).

aWe had two measures of mood which was a measure of how angry and how depressed they were. Both anger and depression levels increased.

aThere were three measures of body image: confidence, satisfaction with muscle tone and overall body image.

aThey all showed a significant decrease as well after being exposed.

aThese effects were found across all of the men exposed to the muscular clips but the effects were stronger in the men already dissatisfied with their appearance who had a poor body image. …

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