Not Work, Not Crime: Who Are the True Agents in Prostitution?

By Kler, Daisy | Canadian Dimension, November-December 2010 | Go to article overview

Not Work, Not Crime: Who Are the True Agents in Prostitution?


Kler, Daisy, Canadian Dimension


IN MY PRACTICE OF FEMINISM I view prostitution as a form of violence against women, racialized misogyny, and a form of exploitation that capitalizes on women's oppression. I come to this opinion as a feminist, south Asian anti-violence worker.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Thinking of prostitution as "sex work" lends legitimacy to prostitution. It suggests that it's a trade like any other, with corresponding occupational hazards. This naming implies that prostitution is a free choice for women, among other viable options. Placing the onus on women, this perspective denies the responsibility of men who humiliate, degrade, and violate them even if they pay for it. Calling it work doesn't remove the stigma attached to prostituted women, but legitimates johns and profiteers of the multinational sex industry--those who do have a choice not to exploit women. Characterizing it as a woman's individual choice and as work conceals the violence and power relations.

In a Vancouver study, 90 percent of women engaged in prostitution said that they would exit if they could, the same percentage that reported having been assaulted in prostitution. The average age of entry into prostitution is fourteen, long before the age of consent, and between 65-90 percent of prostituted women report a history of incest. Prostitution and the issue of choice is better understood as women's lack of choices. Few women have unconstrained choices: one in four women in Canada still faces male violence, and we earn less than men for equal work of equal value. When we consider the inequities experienced by Aboriginal or women of color, the suggestion of freedom of choice becomes even more questionable.

Prostitution reproduces racism, perpetuating it both locally and globally. All women in prostitution are viewed as commodities that perpetuate sexism and capitalize women's poverty but women of color are "sold" to men in a particular way. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Not Work, Not Crime: Who Are the True Agents in Prostitution?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.