Implementing a Collaborative Model of Student Supervision in New Zealand: Enhancing Therapist and Student Experiences

By Flood, Brenda; Haslam, Laura et al. | New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 2010 | Go to article overview

Implementing a Collaborative Model of Student Supervision in New Zealand: Enhancing Therapist and Student Experiences


Flood, Brenda, Haslam, Laura, Hocking, Clare, New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy


Fieldwork educators in New Zealand have begun to use a collaborative model of fieldwork, which involves supervising two or more students at once. Rather than supervising multiple students individually, therapists apply adult learning principles so that students are more self-directed and take advantage of opportunities to learn from each other. As we will describe, the role of fieldwork educators is to support and facilitate learning, but when guided by a collaborative model the workload on fieldwork educators is reduced, students' learning is enhanced, consumers have greater access to occupational therapy, and the students are more able to contribute to the overall objectives of the organisation.

This article will identify the purpose of a collaborative model of fieldwork supervision and describe how it supports students' learning and prepares them for future practice. It will bring together current literature and a case example of applying a collaborative model in a New Zealand health care setting. The goal is to challenge the belief that supervising more than one student at a time is double the workload and to allay fears that the students are disadvantaged in terms of learning opportunities and supervisor support. The discussion includes personal reflections from the second author, who was asked to write about her experiences of implementing the model shortly after completion of the final placement for the year. The thoughts Laura shares examine her experience of the model in her setting and provide practical suggestions to assist others to use the model in their practice context.

The collaborative model

Collaboration in this context is a reciprocal process where two or more people work together toward a common goal. It is closely aligned with peer learning, where participants engage in mutually beneficial experiences which involve the sharing of experiences, knowledge and ideas (Boud, Cohen, & Samson, 2001). Through formalised peer learning, supported by fieldwork educators who provide suitable learning opportunities, students are enabled to take responsibility for their learning and participate in quality learning experiences.

A collaborative model makes it explicit that students have primary responsibility for their own learning. Drawing on ideas developed by Knowles (1970), Tuinjman (1995), and Carnall (1998), those engaged in collaborative learning are framed as adult learners who are self-directed and able to identify their learning needs, accumulate and use experiences and knowledge, undertake critical reflection, and be goal directed. These understandings are reflected in the notion of peer learning, which is central to a collaborative model and requires that students to support each other's learning. When shared, these qualities allow adult learners to actively engage in the learning process.

Preconceived ideas

Faced with the new way of delivering student placements, Laura was initially cautious.

   I imagined that the university was so desperate for placements,
   that they were willing to compromise the quality of the
   placement experience for students. I was also concerned
   about safety for the patients, who might receive interventions
   from students with less than adequate supervision, and for the
   students, who would not have the opportunity to fully observe
   and learn from an experienced Occupational Therapist
   during the 8 week placement. For the students who would
   be coming here for their final placement before qualifying,
   I wondered if this experience would be sufficient to prepare
   them for working as a new graduate.

Such concerns are not uncommon, perhaps accounting for the fact that more than 70% of placements in clinically oriented services offered to AUT University's Department of Occupational Science and Therapy in 2008 were for one registered occupational therapist directly supervising one student. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Implementing a Collaborative Model of Student Supervision in New Zealand: Enhancing Therapist and Student Experiences
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.