A Malfunctioning 'Reset'; Better Relations with Russia Break Down over Charges of Kremlin Corruption

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 16, 2011 | Go to article overview

A Malfunctioning 'Reset'; Better Relations with Russia Break Down over Charges of Kremlin Corruption


Byline: Ed Feulner, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

It has been two years now since President Obama heralded a new era in U.S.-Russian relations - a reset, as he put it. His plan was to cooperate more effectively in areas of common interest. He and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev were committed to leaving behind the suspicion and the rivalry of the past.

Fast-forward to the present. Have things improved? Considering that Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin recently called the United States a parasite on the global economy, and the State Department has put 64 Russian officials on a visa blacklist, it's fair to say: not much.

The latest round of trouble springs from the case of the late Sergei Magnitsky, whose name is probably unfamiliar to many Americans. A lawyer for one of the largest Western hedge funds in Russia, Magnitsky in 2008 accused Russian officials of swindling $230 million in tax rebates. Even in post-Cold War Russia, it was a bold move.

Magnitsky soon found himself arrested for tax evasion. He died in police custody before his trial, having been denied medical care. There were also reports that he had been tortured and beaten. Reliable reports, it appears: Mr. Medvedev himself said the officials in charge of Magnitsky were guilty of crimes.

The Magnitsky case led to the Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act, which was introduced in the U.S. Senate in May. While this bill bears Sergei Magnitsky's name in honor of his sacrifice, the language addresses the overall issue of the erosion of the rule of law and human rights in Russia, said Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin, Maryland Democrat. It offers hope to those who suffer in silence, whose cases may be less known or not known at all.

The State Department visa blacklist, for its part, contains the names of prosecutors and policemen who played a role in Magnitsky's death. The last thing Russian officials want is a spotlight, however well-deserved, on their deplorable human-rights record. …

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A Malfunctioning 'Reset'; Better Relations with Russia Break Down over Charges of Kremlin Corruption
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