Safety First: A Look at How Two Districts Use Security Tech to Protect Their Schools

Technology & Learning, August 2011 | Go to article overview

Safety First: A Look at How Two Districts Use Security Tech to Protect Their Schools


According to the U.S. Department of Justice, 85 percent of public schools recorded at least one incident of crime during the 2007-2008 school year that had taken place at school, amounting to an estimated two million crimes., We don't like to think or talk about it, but school security has become a top priority for school leaders.

The good news is that installing a video surveillance system has gotten easier in the last few years. Today, most security camera systems use IP cameras, which can be either wired or wireless over a computer network. Unlike older analog closed-circuit television systems, IP cameras can be installed by the user and reconfigured as needed. They also let users broadcast footage over the Internet, making it easy to monitor.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

But cameras are just a start. To help create a safe, secure environment and protect against everything from fights and bullying to trespassing and theft, schools are installing video surveillance cameras, physical access controls, and paging and radio systems.

All Systems Go

When IT director Matt Frederickson left the private sector to work at Council Rock (PA) School District in 2003, the IT infrastructure was so poor that, he says, "If the network was up for three days a week, the teachers were thrilled." So Frederickson called Cisco and installed a state-of-the-art network, knowing that a solid backbone was the first step to bringing the district up to date.

At the time, the high schools had limited video surveillance and door-access control deployments, but every camera and door controller required their own power lines, which cost $250 to $300 to install. Additionally, each system had to be managed locally, and video was stored on VCRs at each school.

The IT department, key administrators, and safety officers developed a master security plan. Their goals were for the control systems to be cost effective and easy to use and manage. "We had already invested in a solid IP network, so that became the platform for video surveillance and physical access controls," Frederickson says.

Today, the district has deployed 42 cameras in its two high schools, including wireless Cisco Video Surveillance 2500 series IP Cameras and wired cameras from Sony. The central IT office monitors all of the cameras through Cisco's video surveillance manager software; school resource officers, principals, and the dean can look at any camera's video using a Web browser.

Campus resource officers can move the cameras to any location without advance planning.

Because the video surveillance solution operates over the IP network, Council Rock can grant access to the system to people in any location. The district and the local police department established a memorandum of understanding, giving police permission to view video from cameras outside one of the high school buildings. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Safety First: A Look at How Two Districts Use Security Tech to Protect Their Schools
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.