A Brand Is Born: Taking a Creative Concept to Reality in the Restaurant Industry: Instructors' note.(Instructor's Note)

By Perez, Karri; Damian, Juliet | Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies, September 2011 | Go to article overview

A Brand Is Born: Taking a Creative Concept to Reality in the Restaurant Industry: Instructors' note.(Instructor's Note)


Perez, Karri, Damian, Juliet, Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies


CASE DESCRIPTION

This case highlights the importance of defining the concept and determining the market when launching a new themed brand. The brand was initially scheduled for launch in a smaller international market, but after market research, the launch was rescheduled for a larger, more upscale market. This case has a difficulty level of three and up, appropriate for junior level and beyond. The case is designed to be taught in two to three class hours in a management, marketing or an entrepreneurship course, and is expected to require about three hours of outside preparation for students, consisting mainly of reading the case and familiarizing themselves with trends and opportunities in the restaurant industry.

CASE SYNOPSIS

Most companies do not seriously go through a branding and market exercise prior to launching their business. This case is a review of a thorough exercise that was conducted prior to the launch of the themed brand to determine "who you are and what you stand for" while developing the theme.

INSTRUCTOR'S NOTES

Discussion Questions and Recommended Answers

1. What opportunities do emerging trends offer entrepreneurs?

Many industries have been well grounded in traditional product offerings. New trends, especially those with global implications, offer these industries opportunities in a variety products and services. Product changes

Current products and services can be modified to add or delete components, offering updated product offerings.

Current product lines and services can be diversified, offering completely new products that meet the needs of new markets or new tastes of current market customers Current product lines and services can be edited and products that are no longer relevant can be deleted from the assortment.

2. What is the difference between a trend and a fad?

Fads are short-term in duration with a rapid increase (acceleration) and decrease (deceleration) in sales and market share. Industries tend to gear up for them with short term investments in capital and short term changes to manufacturing and distribution channels. Examples of fads include Beanie Babies and Pogs. The current "go green" trend is global and most industries have made long term investments in capital, manufacturing and equipment and distribution channel modifications. Trends are more long term in duration and far reaching.

3. How can you monitor trends in industries?

The most up-to-date information for trends can be found in professional organization publications and sites that cater to that business group and industry. It is critical to stay abreast of the most current trends in order to lead the industry with new and current product offerings. Every industry has a variety of customers; business to business, business to customer, services to the industry, manufacturing, wholesale, distribution and retail. …

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