The Tea Party Stalwart Fights Back

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 24, 2011 | Go to article overview

The Tea Party Stalwart Fights Back


Byline: John R. Coyne Jr., SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

There's a wonderful scene from the first episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show between Mary and Lou Grant (Ed Asner), her short-tempered boss, teetering on the edge of rage.

You know what? Grant asks. You've got spunk.

Well, yes .. says Mary, trying to smile that wonderful smile

I hate spunk, Grant snaps.

That seems much the case with Christine O'Donnell. She's got spunk. It was spunk that drove her to take on the GOP establishment in 2010 in her run for Joseph R. Biden's Senate seat. (She had run against Mr. Biden as the Republican candidate in 2008.) It was spunk that made her a Tea Party favorite. And it was spunk that compelled her to write this book, an honest and at times touching account of her upbringing and education, her life at work and in politics and her hopes for the future, all presented in fast and upbeat prose, essentially bright and optimistic even when recounting moments of setbacks and stress.

There are those who love that spunk, those who hate it and those, among them smirking television talk-show hosts, who use it to score easy points in the ratings chase. Of the frequently snide and supercilious Bill Maher, for instance, who during the campaign first fired up the inane witchcraft controversy, she writes: I was stunned. More than that I was hurt, because it felt like a betrayal .. I'd thought we were friends

Most recently, there was her abrupt departure from CNN's Piers Morgan Tonight, brought on by questions she correctly labeled as constituting borderline sexual harassment. No surprise there. As the media's treatment of Sarah Palin and Michele Bachmann amply demonstrates, conservative women in politics are fair game for condescending sexist liberals.

But again, it took spunk to stand up and walk off that set.

It also took spunk to weather the attacks from the media and both major parties during her run for the Senate. After winning the 2010 primary against nine-term congressman and former Gov. Mike Castle, the unanimous choice of the GOP establishment, she found that neither Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Tea Party Stalwart Fights Back
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.