F REVER FRIENDS; Amazing Bond Dogs Have with Their Owners

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), August 26, 2011 | Go to article overview

F REVER FRIENDS; Amazing Bond Dogs Have with Their Owners


Byline: Sally McLean

HAWKEYE the Labrador retriever lies beside his master's coffin, refusing to leave his side at an emotional funeral.

Petty Officer Jon Tumilson was one of 38 killed in a US helicopter crash in Afghanistan this month when a grenade took out an American Chinook. And as family gathered to say their farewells, Hawkeye lay beside his master's casket and refused to leave as he was laid to rest.

HONOURED J The picture was taken by Navy SEAL Jon's cousin, Lisa Pembleton, who said: "I felt compelled to take one photo to share with family members who couldn't make it or see what I could see."

The bond between man and dog cannot be underestimated, if these stories are anything to go by.

GREYFRIARS BOBBY This is the tale of police constable John Gray and his watchdog Bobby, a Skye terrier who guarded his master's grave for 14 years after his death.

John died in February 1857 and was buried in Greyfriars Kirk in Edinburgh. James Brown, the keeper and gardener of the burial ground, reported finding Bobby lying on his master's grave.

He was removed from the graveyard as dogs were not allowed but next morning Brown found Bobby in the same place again. Bobby kept up the vigil until he died on January 14, 1872. There is a bronze sculpture of Bobby at the corner of George IV Bridge and Candlemaker Row.

Hachiko HACHIKO In 1924, Hidesaburo Ueno, a professor at the University of Tokyo, took Hachiko, a golden brown Akita, in as a pet.

Hachiko greeted him every day after work at Shibuya train station until May 1925, when his owner did not return.

He had died from a brain haemorrhage. Every day for the next nine years, Hachiko waited at the station for his master, appearing at exactly the time his train was due.

Hachiko died in March 1935.

In August 2009, the film Hachiko: A Dog's Story was released, with Richard Gere in the role of the professor.

SHEP Shep was the name given to a dog who appeared at a Montana station one day in 1936 as a casket was being loaded on to a train. …

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