Shameful Record of Hooligan's Violence; Police Dossier Reveals the Full Extent of Football Thug's Crimes Both Here and Abroad as Banning Order Is Made by Magistrates

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), September 8, 2011 | Go to article overview

Shameful Record of Hooligan's Violence; Police Dossier Reveals the Full Extent of Football Thug's Crimes Both Here and Abroad as Banning Order Is Made by Magistrates


Byline: DAN WARBURTON

PINNED to the ground by Portuguese riot police, soccer thug Christopher Bone brings shame on English football.

His disgraceful Euro exploits in 2004 exposed the largely-hidden underbelly of hooliganism on Tyneside.

Since then Bone has continued to bring match-day violence to the streets of Newcastle.

The 36-year-old was deported from Portugal in 2004 after sparking riots during England's European Championship battle.

But despite receiving a six-month suspended prison sentence, he has spent the following years building up links with Newcastle United's Gremlins.

In September last year Bone was among more than 50 known Gremlins who travelled to York for a drink-fuelled day of violence to celebrate the gang's 25th birthday.

Today the Chronicle can reveal the dossier of disorder that saw Bone mix with some of Tyneside's worst soccer yobs.

His confrontations include being part of a 120-strong group of Toon fans who travelled to Middlesbrough for a pre-arranged dust-up with a rival hooligan gang.

PC Steve Graham, in a football banning application presented to Newcastle Magistrates' Court, said: "The Chief Inspector was of the opinion that these individuals had come to Middlesbrough with the intention to seek disorder and not with a view to watch the match.

"This is based on the intelligence associated with the individuals and the fact they arrived in Middlesbrough after the match had started and that they had sought a confrontation with Middlesbrough risk supporters immediately after departing the railway station.

"The indications were that Middlesbrough were aware that the Newcastle group had yet to arrive."

Bone's list of criminality include offences of being drunk and disorderly, breach of the peace and actual bodily harm. On June 16, 2004, he was arrested in Portugal during the European Championships for a public order offence and resisting arrest.

The following day he appeared at Albufeira Court and was kicked out of the country for 12 months. Four years later, he was convicted at Albufeira Judicial Court of rioting, a footballrelated offence. He was sentenced to six months in prison, suspended for one year.

But it was his bid to protect a hooligan pal from being arrested that eventually saw him booted out of the game for three years.

Bone was at the centre of violent clashes during January's Wear-Tyne derby with fellow risk supporter Jonathan Major. Violence spilled on to the pitch as seats were wrenched from the stadium and hurled at opposing fans.

A dossier by Northumbria Police's football banning unit, states: "At this particular fixture emotions were running high at the final whistle as Sunderland, who had been trailing 0-1, scored a late equalising goal.

"This led to disorder breaking out inside the stadium, with fighting taking place and coins and seats being thrown across the segregation line. In excess of 350 seats were damaged after the match. DVD footage recorded on the day shows a known risk supporter, Jonathan Major, stamping on and breaking seats inside the stadium.

"An officer in protective equipment tries to grab Major and arrest him. As he does so the defendant wrestles him away from the officer and into the crowd."

Following the fixture Major fled to his home in Spain but more than a month later Bone was arrested and given a caution for obstructing an officer. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Shameful Record of Hooligan's Violence; Police Dossier Reveals the Full Extent of Football Thug's Crimes Both Here and Abroad as Banning Order Is Made by Magistrates
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.