Military, CIA Shun 9/11 Panel on Covert Operations; Special-Ops Lead Urged in Report

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 9, 2011 | Go to article overview

Military, CIA Shun 9/11 Panel on Covert Operations; Special-Ops Lead Urged in Report


Byline: Bill Gertz, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The U.S. military and the CIA failed to agree on implementing a key recommendation of the commission that investigated the 9/11 terrorist attacks: Give special-operations commandos the lead for all covert military action.

The 9/11 Commission ordered the shift in response to concerns that CIA covert action - a mainstay of the agency's World War II predecessor, the Office of Strategic Services - had atrophied. The agency also had a risk averse approach to spying and semisecret military activities.

Former Navy Secretary John F. Lehman, a member of the panel, said a report card made public last week by the Bipartisan Policy Center didn't address the failure to implement the covert action change because of the secrecy surrounding the issue.

The situation has evolved far beyond where it was at the time of our report, Mr. Lehman said, adding that the raid to kill Osama bin Laden shows that they are now doing something right.

Retired Army Lt. Gen. William Gerry Boykin, a former Delta Force commando and Pentagon intelligence policymaker during the George W. Bush administration, said that after the commission issued its recommendation in 2004, disagreements arose over bureaucratic turf, and the CIA and the U.S. Special Operations Command (SoCom) could not agree on how to implement it.

The military has expanded special operations forces in recent years. But critics complain that the Pentagon official in charge of the policies for their use is Michael G. Vickers, a former CIA official who comes from the agency's risk-averse, anti-covert-action culture.

Military covert action involves training and equipping foreign military or paramilitary forces in semisecret activities where the U.S. role is hidden. Past programs included arming Cuban rebels for the ill-fated Bay of Pigs invasion, deploying direct-action hit teams in Vietnam, and the arming and training of anti-communist rebels in Latin America and anti-Soviet rebels in Afghanistan.

Since 2004, the CIA's most successful covert military operation was the hunt for bin Laden and the raid to kill him in Pakistan on May 2 with Navy SEALs.

The CIA's other successful covert military action is the war against al Qaeda and other terrorist groups using drone missile strikes in the Middle East and South Asia.

One setback was the suicide bombing by a double agent in December 2009 at a CIA covert base in Khost, Afghanistan, that killed seven agency officers.

The military's most secret units and those involved in covert warfare are the Army's Delta Force and the Naval Special Warfare Development Group, formerly SEAL Team 6.

CIA spokeswoman Marie Harf said the agency and the Pentagon have worked closely in the fight against al Qaeda, notably in the Abbottabad, Pakistan, operation against bin Laden.

Our capabilities are complementary, not duplicative, and the success of those capabilities should speak for itself, she said.

Gen. Boykin said a task force was set up to study the 9/11 recommendation, but it failed to define paramilitary covert action. This was a fundamental question that no one could answer, Gen. Boykin said.

If the commission meant training, SoCom already had the mission of working with surrogates. But paramilitary operations - activities that are militarylike but carried out by groups other than the military - automatically would become military if the function is passed to the Pentagon.

Gen. Boykin said that if the commission wanted to give responsibility for covert action to the Pentagon, the CIA was opposed, arguing that the change would hinder intelligence collection. The agency said its facilities and equipment were dual-use - for spying and paramilitary - and could not be transferred.

Gen. Boykin said the command was against duplicating the CIA's training facilities, methods and equipment, because of high costs needed to age equipment and weapons for operations. …

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