Owners Pack History into Stone Cottages of the Mid-1800s

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 11, 2011 | Go to article overview

Owners Pack History into Stone Cottages of the Mid-1800s


Byline: Deborah Donovan ddonovan@dailyherald.com By Deborah Donovan ddonovan@dailyherald.com

Antique stone cottages have fascinating interiors, histories and residents, right?

Right.

And you can step inside five in St. Charles and Geneva on Sunday, Sept. 18, as part of a weekend celebration by Preservation Partners of the Fox Valley.

The windows flush on the outside and set way back in the thick walls from the inside attracted Rebekah Brigham to the cottage that stone mason Robert Beith built in St. Charles in 1844.

After buying the home 18 years ago, Brigham antiqued the trim in the living room to make the detail stand out. And like most old-house projects, applying the glaze took longer than she had imagined. Think Q-tips.

The homeowner also stripped all the doors in the house, yet another time-consuming project.

Guests will also notice the incredible floor boards up to 24 inches wide. Of course, Brigham exposed them by pulling up carpet and linoleum.

"I was so excited when we got down to the original floors," she said.

Another detail that she loved was the limestone steps to a side porch, but the porch was falling down, so she replaced it with a den and set the limestone in paths around the front of the house. She left the window, peering from the den into the master bedroom, because she couldn't bear to part with the old glass.

Brigham decorated with antiques and furniture her father made that looks like antiques.

"Mom collected children's plates and rocking horses and toys," said Brigham of her late mother, Dorothea. "She had 50 some rocking horses. I could house one."

"Dad made several pieces of furniture. The china cabinet was made out of his old tree house. He braided this rug."

Other gifts from her fahter, Dwight Brigham who still lives in Colorado, are his paintings of the Geneva house and the home Rebekah grew up in. But Rebekah herself stitched those samplers hanging in the living room.

Rebekah Brigham, a designer at the Strawflower Shop in Geneva, seems to effortlessly display collections in her house, while demonstrating how to make the most of small spaces.

CDs are in an old pie safe, with quilts folded and stacked on top of it. Of course the computer hides in a cabinet.

Chocolate molds another of her mother's collections make a great display on an old baker's rack in the kitchen.

Rebekah faux painted the pumpkin-colored dining room with antique gold glaze, then added sayings around each door and window, such as "If life were perfect, there would be nothing to laugh about. Always laugh."

A visitor could miss the subtle decoration provided by old scoops nestling in a wooden box on the dining room table surrounded with mismatched chairs, of course. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Owners Pack History into Stone Cottages of the Mid-1800s
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.