Good Morning Numbers Day: Motivating for Mathematics: Salvador Vidal Ramentol Describes a Project Called "Numbers Day" That Was Designed to Improve Students Attitudes toward Mathematics. There Are Many Features of Numbers Day That Teachers Might Incorporate into Their Own Maths Activity Days

By Ramentol, Salvador Vidal | Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom, Fall 2011 | Go to article overview

Good Morning Numbers Day: Motivating for Mathematics: Salvador Vidal Ramentol Describes a Project Called "Numbers Day" That Was Designed to Improve Students Attitudes toward Mathematics. There Are Many Features of Numbers Day That Teachers Might Incorporate into Their Own Maths Activity Days


Ramentol, Salvador Vidal, Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom


The aversion that many girls and boys experience towards mathematics has been one of my major concerns since I started teaching and to this end I helped to create Numbers Day. The first Numbers Day was held on 29 February 1984. The experience was so successful that it continues to be held nationwide and is currently expanding worldwide. This activity is held every year and we have gathered a great deal of information about the event. We eventually decided to quantify this experience in a research project carried out over two academic years in two centres; one where Numbers Day was held, and another where this was not the case, in order to compare the results.

The following activity is used every year with the students of Didactics of Mathematics in the School of Education at the International University of Catalonia. We are really aiming for the school pupils to be competent in mathematics. In accordance with my current line of investigation we have undertaken a study of the didactics of mathematics in Catalonia.

Objectives

The main objective of the experience was very clear: to improve motivation towards mathematics so as to get students and teachers enjoying learning and teaching mathematics.

There are also further related objectives, namely:

* to raise students' awareness of the use of mathematics in our daily lives;

* to strengthen group dynamics and integration of children with learning difficulties;

* to help students organise themselves and take responsibility for the control and development of games and foster self-regulation of results and rules;

* to stimulate creativity by designing new games, some of which were indeed original and challenging;

* to raise student interest in numerical curiosities;

* to take a cross-curricular approach to the games and involve every member of the teaching staff;

* to improve mathematical calculus;

* to consolidate individual reasoning and the ability to analyse results;

* to improve self-esteem and confidence--praising a pupil who does not normally do well in mathematics is highly motivating;

* to realise that everything you learn can be taught to others.

Activities carried out during the event

Once the objectives were clearly defined, the Department listed some activities to implement Numbers Day, since one of the problems we had at the school was the lack of time to get things ready and we thought that careful planning would be a good way to make things easier for the teachers. The teachers took some of the suggestions on board or changed them to suit their needs.

Activities that were carried out included displaying books about mathematical pastimes with mathematical puzzles. This display was put on with the help of the language department and aimed to promote pleasure for reading and for books with mathematical curiosities. There was also a Games Room where many pupils have learnt new mathematical reasoning games from the older pupils. The pupils themselves decided which games they would like to learn how to play. We looked on the market to see if there were any films related to mathematics and found "Donald in Mathmagic Land" by Walt Disney, which has been shown for several years to different groups.

To motivate the pupils we announced the event the day before. One of the parents accompanying their daughter told us that the girl had asked her mother to brush her hair really well because she was going to take part in Numbers Day and had to be pretty. We made posters advertising Numbers Day which were hung on the walls of the school corridors. We asked the secondary school students (14-16 years) to think of number-related games for the youngest pupils, and see if they could come up with anything better. The PE teacher wanted to contribute by demonstrating how the measuring devices in sport worked. In the week leading up to the event we gave the students some mathematical puzzles to work out with their parents and thus involve the family as well. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Good Morning Numbers Day: Motivating for Mathematics: Salvador Vidal Ramentol Describes a Project Called "Numbers Day" That Was Designed to Improve Students Attitudes toward Mathematics. There Are Many Features of Numbers Day That Teachers Might Incorporate into Their Own Maths Activity Days
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.