A Five-Step Employee Effectiveness Model That Drives Greater Business Outcomes

CRM Magazine, September 2011 | Go to article overview

A Five-Step Employee Effectiveness Model That Drives Greater Business Outcomes


Top-performing customer service organizations understand that employee engagement is a force that drives successful business outcomes. Research shows that highly engaged employees are more than twice as likely to be top performers overall than those employees who are less engaged. What's more, engaged employees are also much less likely to leave, and are more productive and effective. Most critically, they produce higher customer satisfaction ratings and, therefore, larger revenues and greater profitability for the business.

According to Gallup, on average only 33 percent of employees are engaged and the rest are not engaged or actively disengaged. considering that industry statistics also show that it takes, on average, five engaged employees to counteract the negative effects that a customer experiences when interacting with just one disengaged employee, it's clear that every customer interaction counts.

When unleashing the potential for growth by developing a more engaged, efficient and effective organization, the results can be staggering--according to Gallup, the statistic that just 33 percent of employees are engaged in the average organization can increase to as high as 67 percent in top performing organizations.

In most customer service operations, staff costs--such as salary, training and benefits--represent between 60-70 percent of operating expenses. However, despite the fact that the financial stakes are high, many companies don't have a firm grasp on the characteristics and capabilities of their workforces, much less how those characteristics and capabilities impact the quality of customer service.

But what if organizations could: Obtain a complete view of how their employees spend their time? Gain an understanding about their employees' knowledge and skills? Be able to analyze the gaps in employee-to-employee performance? Improve employee engagement with tailored training plans? And ensure employees consistently apply their knowledge and best practices to each and every customer conversation?

The answer: By implementing an Employee Effectiveness Model that aligns training, job assignment, job scheduling, quality assurance and career development to ensure that employees have the right knowledge to provide stellar service to customers.

The premise behind an Employee Effectiveness Model is that if you can: Proactively identify workforce needs before they become critical; get the right insight into employee profiles and gaps; and provide the right training at the right time to ensure you have the right people in the right roles to achieve success--then you can quickly pinpoint passively engaged employees and shift them into being actively engaged ones. …

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