The Knowledge-Driven Support Organization and Its Impact on Customer Experience

By Berry, Diane | CRM Magazine, September 2011 | Go to article overview

The Knowledge-Driven Support Organization and Its Impact on Customer Experience


Berry, Diane, CRM Magazine


Excerpted from the recent Research Study conducted by Omega Management Group and Coveo

In the wake of a global recession, with B2B customers focused more on price than loyalty, and with product complexity and information growing exponentially, contact centers are facing a harsh reality: Knowledge rules. Without a critical knowledge management and access strategy, contact center costs and agent turnover rise, customer satisfaction plummets, and customers jump ship for the competition.

Perhaps the harshest reality contact centers are facing is that the knowledgebase in which they have invested countless dollars and other resources, and which has been the center of their knowledge management strategy, is no longer enough. The results of a recent, landmark survey, conducted by Omega Management Group and Coveo, The Knowledge-Driven Support Organization and Its Impact on Customer Experience,drive home today's harsh contact center realities.

THE KNOWLEDGEBASE, WHILE IMPORTANT, IS NOT ENOUGH

While 67 percent of respondents from organizations with more than 100 employees surveyed report having invested in a knowledgebase initiative, 67 percent of them also indicate that the knowledgebase does not contain all of the information agents need to access to solve customer issues.

The reality may be harshest for those companies in the mid-tier of support. Of companies with 100 to 250 contact center agents, 75 percent cannot find the information they need to solve customer issues in the knowledgebase; for organizations with 251-500 agents, 83 percent cannot find the information in the knowledgebase.

INFORMATION CONTINUES TO PROLIFERATE OUTSIDE THE KNOWLEDGEBASE

Perhaps not surprisingly, among the largest companies, those with more than 10,000 employees, one finds the largest-scale challenge. Forty-three (43) percent of organizations with more than 10,000 employees report that information contact center agents need to access to solve customer issues resides in more than 20 different systems.

CONTACT CENTER CHALLENGES REFLECT KNOWLEDGE ACCESS NEED

When asked specifically about the business impact of having information agents need to solve customer issues distributed across multiple systems, the results were more broad-based. Just 30 percent of respondents said there were no issues. A full 70 percent of respondents indicated that they are facing significant challenges because agents are unable to find necessary information.

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SOLVING THE CHALLENGE: DECISION SUPPORT FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE ENABLES CONSOLIDATED VIEWS OF INFORMATION FROM EVERY SYSTEM AND CHANNEL

Despite a dominant strategy to consolidate systems and information silos over the past two decades, the fact is that on average, companies have twice the number of different information sources as compared to just 10 years ago. …

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