7 QUESTIONS; Scottish Novelist Andrew O'Hagan, Whose Play the Missing Has Been Adapted by the National Theatre of Scotland, at Glasgow's Tramway until October 1

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), September 18, 2011 | Go to article overview

7 QUESTIONS; Scottish Novelist Andrew O'Hagan, Whose Play the Missing Has Been Adapted by the National Theatre of Scotland, at Glasgow's Tramway until October 1


Byline: Andrew O'Hagan

Your debut novel The Missing deals with grisly subject matter like the killings carried out by Bible John and Fred West. ITV has been criticised for dramatising Fred and Rose West's crimes recently - what's a writer's perspective on telling these stories in books, TV and theatre? It's great when drama is able to step up and deal with some difficult questions. It excites me that it can do that job.

We don't shrink from it when it's done in soap opera, which often engages millions of people on subjects that are controversial and quite hard.

Drama should get in there and give people food for thought on some of the great dilemmas of the day.

The ITV programme is a brave and successful attempt to enter into a famous and difficult story. It's the responsibility of drama to do that, whether on TV or on stage.

Some people argue that Responsible Adult on ITV is in bad taste. Are you concerned your play might get a similar response from such people? I would be surprised if anybody would take the view that it is in poor taste to try to understand the ethics of what goes on in a situation like that - what caused these murders, how these girls became victims.

To say that it's in bad taste to ask these questions is something I would simply disagree with. Accusations of bad taste don't even apply as far as I'm concerned.

There is no subject beyond discussion for writers and performers - and viewers. You wrote The Missing while on assignment at Cromwell Street for a London newspaper as a young writer. What made you think 'novel'? I knew right away I wanted to write a book about it.

I realised the biggest question of all wasn't being asked or written by anybody, which was why so many of those women had never been reported as missing by their parents, friends, boyfriends or ex-boyfriends. Some of West's victims came from Glasgow, like Rena Costello and Ann McFall.

I started digging for as much as I could about their lives. I realised if I could get to the story of those missing Glasgow women, I'd be reaching into the story of how the past lives in our minds.

There was a media frenzy about the girls and how they died, but there was nothing about their lives. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

7 QUESTIONS; Scottish Novelist Andrew O'Hagan, Whose Play the Missing Has Been Adapted by the National Theatre of Scotland, at Glasgow's Tramway until October 1
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.