Being a Genius Isn't Easy for Inverness Man

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 22, 2011 | Go to article overview

Being a Genius Isn't Easy for Inverness Man


If Patrick Hurst's mind isn't constantly stimulated, this ... is ... what ... he ... hears ... all ... day ... long.

That's how a social worker for gifted children described life for Patrick years ago, giving his parents some insight into how much quicker his brain processes, making normal things seem slower, and why he'd lose focus so easily.

It's a reality that prompted the now 20-year-old from Inverness to learn calculus on his own in sixth grade, read software manuals growing up and voluntarily teach computer science classes as a student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he now is a junior.

"He has to have something occupying his mind, practically at all waking hours," his mother, Nancy Hurst, said.

But being profoundly gifted and an off-the-charts genius presents a set of challenges for Patrick, be it boredom, feeling like an outsider or a resistance to structure so unyielding he spent a year at military school.

"I can be stubborn and I don't

like doing things that I don't want to do," Patrick said. "It's still kind of a problem I have, but I'm getting better at it."

Parents Patrick and Nancy first noticed their son, an Illinois Math and Science Academy graduate who in 2009 was one of 20 people in the nation selected for the U.S. Physics Team, exhibited signs of extraordinary intelligence at about age 1.

Patrick would scan through car magazines as he sat in his high chair, and then identify different makes and models when the family was out. To make sure the toddler simply hadn't memorized the words in a Dr. Seuss book, Nancy would skip a page and see he was indeed reading. And Patrick would recite restaurant menus, much to waitresses' amazement.

Teachers at Windsor Elementary School in Arlington Heights didn't know how to handle Patrick, finding inadequate ways to challenge the first-grader such as sending him to the library to work on an independent project on rocks and minerals.

They recommended the Hursts look at Quest Academy, a private school in Palatine that enrolls nearly 300 gifted students from about 50 communities.

When Patrick, then 6 or 7, took an IQ test as an admission requirement, he scored better than 200, a number so rare his intelligence is considered unmeasurable.

The Hursts doubt the validity of that test, but to put his score inflated or not into perspective, only 0.1 percent of people in the world have an IQ of at least 145, according to the widely used Wechsler scale. And Albert Einstein was said to have had an IQ of about 160.

Patrick never bothered taking another test because the result was clear: He was profoundly gifted and had very different needs than normal kids.

"Sometimes children intellectually can be way, way ahead but emotionally are right there where they're supposed to be," Quest Academy Head of School Ben Hebebrand said. "There's an asynchronicity in development."

Patrick quickly built an impressive resume, completing eighth-grade math curriculum as a second-grader and getting first-place scores on Midwest Academic Talent Search tests through Northwestern University's Center for Talent Development. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Being a Genius Isn't Easy for Inverness Man
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.