Prosecutors Look into Messy Divorce That Raises Questions; Others Wonder Why Authorities Would Take on What Looks like a Family Dispute

By Causey, Adam Kealoha | The Florida Times Union, September 20, 2011 | Go to article overview

Prosecutors Look into Messy Divorce That Raises Questions; Others Wonder Why Authorities Would Take on What Looks like a Family Dispute


Causey, Adam Kealoha, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Adam Kealoha Causey

The State Attorney's Office in St. Johns County has launched a criminal probe into a 2009 divorce filing in the county that experts call unusual.

Investigators are tight-lipped with details of their involvement in the civil case, citing the ongoing investigation. But the inquiry landed a woman in jail on a perjury charge, first in North Carolina and last week in St. Johns County, where she could be brought to trial.

The investigation stems from accusations that the woman divorced her husband - who suffered from Alzheimer's-type dementia and has since died - when they lived out of state. That's a violation of Florida law.

And it has led to questions about how easy it is to dissolve a marriage, whether the husband was competent to sign off on the divorce, and why the state attorney is concerned with what appears to be a family dispute.

FLORIDA RESIDENTS?

The late Bob Thurston owned property in Ponte Vedra Beach, court documents show. Divorce paperwork lists a Sawgrass condo on Tifton Way as the residence he shared with his second wife, Sherrill, to whom he'd been married since 1985.

But Tracie Thurston Carrico, Bob's daughter, said her father and stepmother didn't live in Florida but in Wilmington, N.C.

That appears to be the basis of the state attorney's case.

Prosecutors say Thurston lied about where she lived when she filed for divorce, according to Shannon Peters, a spokeswoman for the State Attorney's Office. State law requires at least one spouse to live in Florida for six months before being able to file.

St. Johns County issued a warrant for Thurston's arrest on a felony count of perjury, and she spent Sept. 8-12 behind bars, according to the New Hanover County (N.C.) sheriff's office. Thurston, 68, was released after posting $2,000 bond.

Thurston was booked again and released on $5,000 bond from the St. Johns County jail on Friday, records show.

Phone calls from the Times-Union to numbers listed at Thurston's residence and a hair salon she owns went unreturned.

HEALTH CONCERNS

Bob Thurston was 64 and staying in a nursing home in Kentucky when he died in December. Carrico said dementia made him a shell of the healthy man he was.

Dealing with his health was more difficult, Carrico said, because he had little money following the divorce: Sherrill Thurston took most of it and left her former husband with almost $250,000 in IRS and credit card debt.

His family could have paid for his medical expenses had they had access to his money, Carrico said. Instead, Medicaid covered most costs.

"The taxpayers were screwed over as well," said Carrico, of Lexington, Ky. "They should not have had to foot that bill."

Her father's weakened state of mind also contributed to what Carrico considers a messy divorce. She contends he didn't understand the agreement - pointing to his illegible scribble below divorce paper signature lines on the Nov. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Prosecutors Look into Messy Divorce That Raises Questions; Others Wonder Why Authorities Would Take on What Looks like a Family Dispute
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.